11 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Howe, Julia Ward, 1819-1910.

  1. Grosvenor family papers, 1827-1981

    67,300 items. 192 containers. 76.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Correspondence, diaries, speeches and writings, subject material, financial papers, printed matter, and personal miscellany, chiefly 1872-1964, of various members of the Grosvenor family, principally of Amherst and Millbury, Mass., and Washington, D.C.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  2. Julia Ward Howe papers, 1845-1917

    200 items. 5 containers. 2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Author and reformer. Chiefly speeches and writings, with correspondence, notes, and printed matter pertaining to education, immigration, prison reform, race relations, religion, and women's rights.

  3. William Dudley Foulke papers, circa 1470-1952

    2,500 items. 12 containers plus 1 oversize. 5.2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Lawyer, public official, and author from Indiana. Correspondence, diaries, journals, copybook, speeches, writings, notes, legal papers, clippings, printed material, and other papers, including a late fifteenth century fragment of the Tristram Saga obtained by Arthur Middleton Reeves on a trip to Iceland. The bulk of the collection consists of Foulke's correspondence reflecting his literary career and public service, including letters from Theodore Roosevelt discussing civil service reform, the Progressive movement, Woodrow Wilson, the World Court (Permanent Court of International Justice), and pacifism.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  4. Oliver Wendell Holmes papers, 1837-1931

    700 items. 11 containers plus 1 oversize. 2.5 linear feet. 3 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Poet, essayist, physician, and educator. Correspondence and literary manuscripts in bound volumes.

  5. Charlotte Cushman papers, 1823-1941

    10,000 items. 21 containers plus 1 oversize. 5.5 linear feet. 1 microfilm reel. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Actress. Correspondence; biographical and genealogical material; annotated scripts and texts of plays, poetry, and readings; newspaper clippings; reviews; and souvenir programs relating chiefly to Cushman's career in the theater.

  6. Joshua R. Giddings and George Washington Julian papers, 1839-1899

    900 items. 7 containers. 1.8 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    United States representative from Ohio, abolitionist, and consul general to Canada (Joshua R. Giddings); United States representative from Indiana and biographer (George Washington Julian). Chiefly family letters of Giddings and Julian, together with some political correspondence. Topics include Ohio and Indiana politics and the abolition of slavery.

  7. Louise Chandler Moulton papers, 1852-1908

    9,000 items. 51 containers. 10.4 linear feet. 15 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Author. Chiefly letters received by Moulton from prominent literary figures in the United States, England, and Europe with some holograph poems. Also includes correspondence of the English poet John Marston and his son Philip Bourke Marston.

  8. Henry L. Dawes papers, 1833-1933

    22,000 items. 64 containers plus 2 oversize. 30 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    United States representative and senator from Massachusetts. Correspondence, memoranda, letterbooks, diaries, speeches, reports, notebooks, biographical material, family papers, photographs, citations, congressional commissions, scrapbooks, clippings, printed matter, and an incomplete biography of Dawes by his daughter, Anna Laurens Dawes. The collection documents mainly Dawes's career as a federal legislator and his work on issues relating to the American Indian, including his tenure as chairman of the Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  9. Blackwell family papers, 1759-1960

    29,000 items. 96 containers. 40 linear feet. 76 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Family members include author and suffragist Alice Stone Blackwell (1857-1950); her parents, Henry Browne Blackwell (1825-1909) and Lucy Stone (1818-1893), abolitionists and advocates of women's rights; her aunt, Elizabeth Blackwell (1821-1910), the first woman to receive an academic medical degree; and Elizabeth Blackwell's adopted daughter, Kitty Barry Blackwell (1848-1936). Includes correspondence, diaries, articles, and speeches of these and other Blackwell family members.

  10. National American Woman Suffrage Association records, 1839-1961

    26,700 items. 98 containers. 39.2 linear feet. 73 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Founded in 1890 by the merger of the National Woman Suffrage Association and the American Woman Suffrage Association. Records comprising correspondence, a subject file relating chiefly to state and local suffrage organizations and leaders in the movement, scrapbooks prepared by Ida Porter Boyer documenting activities in the women's rights movement (1893-1912), and miscellaneous printed matter.