15 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Instrumental music.

  1. Irving Fine collection, 1930-1993

    approximately 4,350 items. 21 boxes. 7 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Irving Fine was an American conductor, teacher, and composer whose works assimilated neoclassical, romantic, and serial elements. The bulk of the materials in the collection are musical scores and sketches which represent nearly his entire musical output. In addition, there are photographs, clippings, programs, and scrapbooks, as well as correspondence from twentieth-century musicians such as Leonard Bernstein, Aaron Copland, Lukas Foss, Alberto Ginastera, Ned Rorem, and William Schuman.

  2. Edison sheet music collection, 1830-1958

    circa 13,000 items. 148 containers. 444 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection consists chiefly of American sheet music published in the United States between the years 1830-1930. While a significant minority of the music in the collection is instrumental music, the vast majority is for voice and piano. Notable in this collection are imprints from California dating from before 1850, first editions by Irving Berlin and others, and many European imprints among the instrumental pieces.

  3. William A. Newland and Charles Zeuner collection of music, circa 1735-circa 1900

    around 2,000 items. 58 boxes. 20 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Primarily music (printed and manuscript) for piano, 2 or 4 hands, and songs, with a concentration in sacred vocal works in Latin and English. (The music in Latin may represent the only known source of pre-Cäcilienverein 19th-century American Catholic Church music.) Composers range from Mozart and Rossini to George F. Root and Oliver Shaw. The collection contains the largest extant source of music by Charles Zeuner which was purchased by Newland after Zeuner's death.

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  4. Hodges family collection, circa 1790-circa 1909

    around 430 items. 64 boxes. 16 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection contains manuscript and printed music, writings, and other materials compiled and collected by Edward Hodges and subsequently by his son, John Sebastian Bach Hodges. Noteworthy among Edward Hodges' writings are the Annuary, an attempt in later life to depict his earlier life, and documents relating to the design and construction of the 1846 Erben organ at Trinity Church in New York. Music scores and sketches of the collection may well be the largest extant source of Hodges' manuscript music, including both original music and transcriptions and arrangements of the works of others, mostly intended for performance during religious services. In addition, the collection includes manuscript and printed scores for the works of two of Edward Hodges' children, Faustina Hasse Hodges and John Sebastian Bach Hodges. Sacred music in the collection not composed by Hodges family members provides insight into the kind of music that was typically performed in Episcopal churches in this country during the 19th and early 20th centuries: chants, psalm and hymn tunes, litanies, introits, offertories, oratorios, etc. Especially interesting are the Breitkopf & Härtel publications of Haydn's Die Worte des Erlösers am Kreuze from 1801 and an early publication of Beethoven's Christus am Oldberge. Among the scores of secular music, John Stafford Smith's Musica Antiqua (London, 1812), an anthology of music from the 13th through the 18th centuries, is particularly noteworthy, as is Chant lyrique pour l'inauguration de la statue votée à sa Majesté l'empereur et roi by Etienne Méhul. The collection also includes sixteen volumes of late 18th and 19th century sheet music that were presumably compiled by one or more members of the Hodges family.

  5. Halsey Stevens papers, circa 1920-1987

    approximately 2,500 items. 51 containers. 20.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Halsey Stevens was an American composer, musicologist, and teacher. He is best known for his chamber music works and published monograph, The Life and Music of Béla Bartók. The collection contains music manuscripts, writings, research materials, programs, correspondence, and other materials related to his projects. Only the music materials are available online at this time. These materials consist of scores, parts, and sketches for instrumental works for keyboard, chamber ensemble, and full orchestra, as well as vocal and choral works and arrangements for varying instrumentations.

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  6. Selma Epstein collection, 1931-1987

    72 items. 5 containers. 2.6 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Selma Epstein (1927-2014) was a concert pianist, teacher, promoter of contemporary music, and champion of 20th-century black and female composers. The collection contains contemporary music scores, many by women and African-American composers, as well as a small amount of clippings and promotional materials.

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  7. German national music collection, 1846-1974

    approximately 1,500 items. 31 containers. 14 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The German National Music Collection primarily contains manuscript and published sheet music, songbooks, and lyric sheets related to and written for the German armed forces, with the largest majority of this material having been published during the period of the Third Reich (1933-1945).

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  8. Arsis Press records, 1947-2007

    approximately 7,260 items. 32 containers. 13 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Arsis Press was a music publishing company in Washington, D.C., founded by composer Clara Lyle Boone in 1974 to publish music by women composers. The Arsis Press Records include printed music by nearly forty composers, financial records, business papers, and correspondence.

  9. Milton Babbitt music sketches, 1899-2006

    approximately 765 items. 21 containers. 7 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Milton Babbitt was an American composer, mathematician, music theorist, and teacher best known for his innovations in the fields of serial and electronic music. The collection primarily consists of holograph sketches for original compositions by Babbitt, including his highly-regarded Philomel (1964), Reflections (1966), and Quintet for clarinet and strings (1997). Also included is a selection of correspondence and an inventory of his book library.

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  10. Alexander Zemlinsky music manuscripts and other papers, 1887-1939

    approximately 350 items. 28 containers. 8 linear feet. 13 microfilm reels. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Alexander Zemlinsky was an Austrian composer, conductor, pianist, and educator whose students included Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg, Erich Wolfgang Korngold, Alma Mahler, and Anton Webern. The collection consists of holograph music manuscripts for nearly all of Zemlinsky’s repertoire, as well as some printed music. Other materials include manuscript and printed music by other composers, personal papers, correspondence, and writings by others.