5 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) International Psycho-Analytical Association.

  1. Karl Abraham papers, 1908-1925

    50 items ; 1 container ; .2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Psychoanalyst. Correspondence, circular letters, drafts of statements, a book inscription, and a program documenting Abraham’s role in the founding of psychoanalysis, particularly in his native Germany.

  2. Phyllis Greenacre papers, 1903-1999

    3,000 items ; 12 containers ; 4.8 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Psychoanalyst, psychiatrist, educator, and author. Correspondence, writings, and other material relating to Greenacre's psychoanalytic career and to her role in the New York Psychoanalytic Institute.

  3. International Psycho-Analytical Association records, 1933-1971

    9,000 items ; 11 containers ; 4.4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    International association of the psychoanalytical movement. The records include correspondence, memoranda, minutes, constitution and bylaws, reports, printed matter, and other papers primarily from Piet van der Leeuw's term (1965-1970) as president of the organization.

  4. Maxwell Gitelson papers, 1918-1965

    25,000 items ; 107 containers ; 43 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Psychiatrist and psychoanalyst. Chiefly correspondence, minutes, bylaws, reports, financial records, printed matter, and other records of psychoanalytic organizations in which Gitelson was a leader or member.

  5. Princess Marie Bonaparte papers, 1889-1962

    6,300 items ; 33 containers ; 13 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Psychoanalyst and author. Journals, correspondence, drafts of writings, notebooks, legal records, obituaries, genealogical notes, photographs, watercolor drawings, and printed matter relating to Bonaparte's involvement in the field of psychoanalysis.