2 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Korson, George Gershon, 1899-1967--Correspondence.

  1. George Korson collection, 1913-1975

    37,117 items ; 106 containers (not including AV) ; 57 linear feet (not including AV).. 112 sound discs : analog ; 12 in., 10 in., and 7 in.. 108 sound tape reels : analog ; 7 in.. 6 sound tape reels : analog ; 5 in.. 1 sound cassette : analog. 1 film reel (ca. 8 minutes) : sound, black and white ; 16 mm. approximately 623 photographs : photographic prints, negatives, black and white; various sizes.. 4 graphic items : various media.. 2 items.. 36,259 items.. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collection of professional papers, field recordings of interviews and songs, a film, and photographs documenting the career and folklife fieldwork of George Korson. George Korson conducted fieldwork in the anthracite coal region of Pennsylvania and also in Pennsylvania Dutch Country in eastern counties of Pennsylvania. The film dated October 12, 1964 is George Korson (with Charlie McCarthy) interviewed by Franklin D. Coslett. The collection also includes various papers and interviews created by Angus K. Gillespie, including his interviews with folklorist and labor historian Archie Green. Gillespie is the author of a biography of George Korson, titled Folklorist of the coal fields : George Korson's life and work (Pennsylvania State University Press, 1980).

  2. John A. Lomax and Alan Lomax papers, 1907-1969

    approximately 4900 items; 14 boxes; 5.6 linear feet.. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collection of correspondence, research notes, transcripts, sheet music, manuscript music transcriptions, song texts, song books, maps, and administrative documents dating primarily from the tenure of John A. Lomax and his son Alan Lomax at the Archive of American Folk Song, Library of Congress, from 1932-1942, but with a few items dating to the 1960s. Correspondents include various staff at the Library of Congress, in particular, Harold Spivacke; and folklorists, musicians, writers, academics, film directors, and others, including Huddie "Lead Belly" Ledbetter and Woody Guthrie; various government agencies including the Works Progress Administration, Federal Writers' Project, and War Department; broadcasting and record companies; publishers; and fans of Alan Lomax's radio shows, who sent in contributions of folk songs and folklore from their childhood and communities. Documents include drafts of speeches, lectures, articles, and drafts of their books for publication.