7 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) MacDowell, Marian, 1857-1956.

  1. MacDowell Colony records, 1869-2017

    82,000 items. 214 containers plus 4 oversize. 90 linear feet. 1 microfilm reel. 1,252 digital files (9.63 GB). -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The MacDowell Colony was founded as an artist colony in Peterborough, New Hampshire, in 1907 by Marian MacDowell who dedicated it as a memorial to her husband, American composer Edward MacDowell. The bulk of the records reflects the operational and administrative functions of the colony, its parent organization, the Edward MacDowell Association, and its fundraising staff based in New York. Consists of correspondence, applications for admission, minutes of meetings, reports, legal and financial papers, fundraising and event planning materials, office files, and miscellany.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  2. Marian MacDowell papers, 1876-1969

    2000 items. 10 containers. 3.8 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Correspondence, manuscripts of writings, clippings and other printed material, memorabilia, and other papers relating primarily to Marian MacDowell's activities with the MacDowell Colony, the artist colony in Peterborough, N.H., established to honor her husband, Edward MacDowell.

  3. Arnold T. Schwab collection on Marian Nevins MacDowell, 1731-1993

    approximately 23,380 items. 57 containers. 16 linear feet. 8 microfilm reels. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Arnold T. Schwab Collection on Marian Nevins MacDowell is an archive of materials related to the life and work of Marian Nevins MacDowell, founder of the MacDowell Colony in Peterborough, New Hampshire, named for her late husband, composer Edward MacDowell (1860-1908). The writings, correspondence, iconography, scrapbooks, index cards, and other papers reflect collector and donor Arnold T. Schwab's interest in and research on the MacDowell legacy.

  4. Albert Goldberg correspondence, 1947-1981

    approximately 150 items. 2 containers. .75 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Music critic Albert Goldberg wrote for the Chicago Tribune and the Los Angeles Times, among other publications. This collection of correspondence contains letters, telegrams, invitations, and greeting cards, primarily from composers, conductors, performers, arts administrators, and fellow music critics sharing their reactions to Goldberg's reviews of their works and performances.

  5. Louise Talma papers, 1861-1998

    approximately 38,000 items. 160 containers. 81.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Louise Talma was an American composer, pianist, and teacher. She was a student of Nadia Boulanger and a long-time resident of Fontainebleau and the MacDowell Colony in Peterborough, New Hampshire. The collection consists of music manuscripts, harmony and teaching materials, correspondence, photographs, business papers, clippings, programs, publicity materials, writings, awards and other materials related to her career and her family's history.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  6. Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation collection, 1894-1953

    56,680 items. 109 containers. 48.50 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge was a composer, pianist, and patron of music. In 1925, she created the Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation at the Library of Congress in support of chamber music. The collection contains Coolidge's correspondence to and from many of the prominent musical artists of the first half of the twentieth century. Extensive correspondence between Coolidge and Library of Congress librarians and administrators is also included. The remaining materials in the collection, including photographs, scrapbooks, business papers, programs, publicity materials, iconography, realia, and clippings, are available for research and will be incorporated into the finding aid at a later date. Music manuscripts of works commissioned by Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge or the Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation in the Library of Congress comprise a substantial portion of the collection and are cataloged individually.

  7. A.P. Schmidt Company archives, 1869-1958

    34,775 items. 514 containers. 280 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Arthur Paul Schmidt (1846-1921) was a German-born music publisher who pioneered the development and dissemination of American music. The A.P. Schmidt Company Archives documents his firm's publishing activites in Boston, Leipzig and New York, beginning with his tenure, through his successors, and until the firm was absorbed by Summy-Birchard in 1960. The Archives consists of the original manuscripts from which the music was printed, printed music, personal and corporate correspondence, photographs (primarily composers/arrangers), business records, plate books, publication books, stock and cash books.