3 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Martha Graham Dance Company--History.

  1. Benjamin Garber papers, 1916-2009

    835 items . 8 containers. 4.3 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Benjamin Garber (1927-2001) was a distinguished interior designer who had a brief career as a dancer and enjoyed a close personal relationship with modern dance icon Martha Graham until the mid-1970s. The materials in the collection focus primarily on Garber's relationship with Martha Graham. Graham-related materials include correspondence, photographs, Graham dance company papers, programs, clippings and articles, and oral histories. Graham's convalescence at Garber's home Cross River is documented among these materials, as is Garber’s career as an interior designer and art collector.

  2. Maxine Glorsky papers relating to Martha Graham, 1940-2019

    3,455 items. 31 containers. 18 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection of Maxine Glorsky focuses on her relationship with the Martha Graham Dance Company as its stage manager during the 1970s and early 1980s. It also incorporates substantial material from Jean Rosenthal, Graham’s lighting designer during the 1940s and 1950s. The collection includes many cue sheets for both stage management and lighting purposes, lighting plots, related technical materials, business papers for Glorsky’s Technical Assistance Group (TAG) Foundation and Rosenthal’s Theatre Production Service (TPS), correspondence, and a modest amount of publicity, news clippings, and programs.

  3. Cesi Kellinger collection of dance materials, 1842-1994

    approximately 220 items. 6 containers. 2.25 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Cesi Kellinger (1922-2014) was an antiquarian bookseller based in Pennsylvania. This collection consists of dance-related photographs, illustrations, books, promotional materials, performance programs, articles and clippings, and correspondence dating between 1842 and 1994. These items pertain to the careers of prominent dancers, choreographers, and educators, including Ruth St. Denis, Ted Shawn, and Martha Graham. Kellinger collected the items and donated them to the Library of Congress in 2011.