8 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Maryland--Social life and customs.

  1. Charles Nicoll Bancker correspondence, 1803-1830

    220 items ; 3 containers ; .6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Merchant of Philadelphia, Pa. Correspondence addressed to Bancker primarily from his father-in-law, John Teackle, and brother-in-law, Littleton Dennis Teackle, as well as other members of the Teackle family of Maryland. Pertains to family and business matters and documents national economic and political issues related to the family's interests in banking, commerce, and shipbuilding.

  2. Rumsey family papers, 1661-1907

    1,000 items ; 5 containers plus 1 oversize ; 2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Family of Bohemia Manor, Cecil County, Md. Correspondence among family members; wills; surveys, deeds, plats, and other documents relating to land ownership; personal and business financial accounts; contracts and other legal documents; sermons; and notes on family history.

  3. Jonathan D. Meredith papers, 1795-1859

    9,000 items ; 15 containers plus 1 oversize ; 6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Lawyer, army officer, and businessman of Baltimore, Md. Family and general correspondence, legal files, financial papers, and other material relating chiefly to Meredith's associations with the Savings Bank of Baltimore and the Bank of the United States; the War of 1812; impeachment proceedings against James Hawkins Peck; shipping and trade with Europe and South America; and settlement of the...

  4. Feamster family papers, 1794-1967

    3,000 items ; 5 containers ; 2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Members of the Feamster (Feemster) family. Diaries, notebooks, correspondence, financial and legal papers, writings, and miscellaneous material illustrating the activities of four interrelated families from 1794 to 1967 whose members were engaged in farming, the law, medicine, the military, politics, religion, and other pursuits in Virginia, West Virginia, Missouri, Arkansas, Texas, Kansas,...

  5. Carroll family papers, 1684-1838

    350 items ; 5 containers ; 1 linear foot. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Carroll family members including Charles Carroll (1702-1782), landowner, of Annapolis, Maryland, and his son, Charles Carroll, member of the Continental Congress, signer of the Declaration of Independence, and United States senator, of Carrollton, Maryland. Letters, deeds, bills, accounts, and account books of Charles Carroll of Annapolis, Maryland, and other family papers.

  6. William Wirt papers, 1802-1858

    1,800 items ; 9 containers plus 1 oversize ; 2.2 linear feet ; 4 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Lawyer, politician, U. S. attorney general, and biographer. Correspondence, writings, and printed matter pertaining to Wirt’s family and career as a lawyer, politician, and author.

  7. Grosvenor family papers, 1827-1981

    67,300 items ; 192 containers ; 76.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Correspondence, diaries, speeches and writings, subject material, financial papers, printed matter, and personal miscellany, chiefly 1872-1964, of various members of the Grosvenor family, principally of Amherst and Millbury, Mass., and Washington, D.C.

  8. Ward family papers, 1831-1904

    2,600 items ; 11 containers ; 3.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Family from Richmond County, Virginia. Correspondence, broadsides, songs, financial records, printed matter, and other papers of William Norvell Ward, Episcopal clergyman and Confederate soldier, and members of his family including material relating to the Civil War, Reconstruction, and social life and customs in Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Maryland, and northern Virginia.