8 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Memorandums.

  1. Society for American Music records, 1971-2001

    approximately 40,000 items. 115 containers. 49 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Society for American Music, an educational organization founded in 1975 by a group of American music enthusiasts, is dedicated to promoting the study, teaching, creation, and dissemination of music in the Americas. The society was originally named in honor of American musicologist, librarian, and editor Oscar G. T. Sonneck (1873-1928), the first critical scholar and bibliographer of American music, and first chief of the music division of the Library of Congress. The records range from the founding of the society to 1999, when it changed its name to the Society for American Music. Materials include correspondence, minutes, reports, memorandums, conference materials, bylaws, handbooks, committee records, publicity and promotional materials, financial papers, materials related to its publications American Music and Sonneck Society Bulletin, photographs and realia.

  2. Sidney Robertson Cowell collection, 1901-1992

    5067 items. 28 containers. 13 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Sidney Robertson Cowell (1903-1995) was a folksong and ethnic music collector and recordist, ethnographer, ethnomusicologist, teacher, writer, and wife of composer Henry Cowell. The collection consists of her personal papers which document all aspects of her life and work. The collection includes correspondence relating to personal and professional matters; fieldwork reports, fieldnotes, song lists and other materials from her field recording projects and trips; articles, essays, reviews, and papers written by Sidney Robertson Cowell; articles and narratives by and about Henry Cowell; autobiographical narratives and essays, clippings, family histories and other materials relating to her professional career and personal life; photographs; teaching materials; and song sheets and song books. In addition, the collection contains photocopies of a selection of Henry Cowell holographs, several annotated by Sidney Robertson Cowell, and a selection of folk songs with piano settings by Henry Cowell in his own hand.

  3. United States Information Agency Artistic Ambassador Program musical commissions, 1973-1988

    approximately 50 items. 4 containers. 2.60 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    This collection consists of works commissioned by the United States Information Agency and other materials related to the organization’s Artistic Ambassador Program. It includes holograph music manuscripts, sketches, performance reviews, biographical materials, and administrative documents.

  4. Federal Theatre Project collection, 1932-1943

    around 525,000 items. 1,475 containers. 523 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Federal Theatre Project, created by the U.S. Works Progress Administration in 1935, was designed to conserve and develop the skills of theater workers, re-employ them on public relief, and to bring theater to thousands in the United States who had never before seen live theatrical performances. The collection includes correspondence, memoranda, play and radio scripts, reports, research studies, manuals, publications, bulletins, forms, lists, newspaper clippings, scrapbooks, charts, costume and set designs, blue-prints, posters, addressograph plates, photographs, negatives, slides, playbills, and other records documenting the activities of the Federal Theatre Project and its impact on all aspects of the theater.

  5. Bob Hope collection, circa 1900-2009

    557,000 items ; 770 linear feet (1958 boxes). 71,300 items ; 91 linear feet (187 boxes). -- Recorded Sound Research Center, Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Bob Hope Collection consists of scripts, jokes, monologues, correspondence, manuscripts, promotional materials, photographs, and clippings documenting Hope's work as an entertainer, actor, comedian, and philanthropist, across multiple mediums and disciplines including radio, television, film, and live performance.

  6. Emile Berliner collection, 1871-1965

    41 boxes (approximately 1,000 items). 232 photographic prints : . 29 negatives : . over 400 sound discs, including zinc, copper, celluloid, rubber, shellac, and vinyl pressings and masters, in various speeds, and in sizes ranging from 5 to 12 inches in diameter. 1 film reel of 1 (12 feet) : . over 100 items, chiefly telephone, gramophone, and laboratory equipment, with 7 acoustic insulating panels and material samples, all made of various materials and in various sizes. -- Recorded Sound Research Center, Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Unpublished and published textual materials, photographs, sound recordings, scrapbooks, artifacts, and a motion picture documenting the life and work of the German-born immigrant to America who invented the gramophone, the flat disc recording, the radio microphone, acoustic tile, and an early version of the helicopter. Included are unpublished and experimental gramophone records dating from the 1890s, some of them featuring the voices of Berliner and various family members, as well as recordings published by Berliner's gramophone companies in the U.S., Canada, and Germany.

  7. Jay I. Kislak Collection, 2000 BCE-2007 CE

    1,350 items. -- Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Jay I. Kislak Collection encompasses almost fourteen hundred rare books, maps, manuscripts, historical documents, graphic works, and archaeological objects related to the history of the early Americas, including the pre-Columbian cultures of the Caribbean and Mesoamerica.

  8. Jerry Lewis papers, 1951-2011

    approximately 45,650 items. 220 containers. 66 linear feet. -- Moving Image Research Center, Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Jerry Lewis Papers consist of scripts and sketch material; memos and other correspondence; itineraries; business and legal papers; photographic prints, proof sheets, and negatives; press clippings and publicity; and other materials related to the film and television career of comedian, actor, and filmmaker Jerry Lewis, primarily from the period following the breakup of the act he formed with singer and comedian Dean Martin. Also included are papers related to Lewis's work with the Muscular Dystrophy Association's annual telethon, and his teaching work at the University of Southern California.