13 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Modern dance--United States--History.

  1. Muriel Manings and William Korff papers, 1914-2007

    1,088 items . 6 containers. 2.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Performer and teacher Muriel Manings and her husband William Korff, a performer, dance historian, and writer, compiled a substantial collection of materials that highlight activities of the New Dance Group, with particular emphasis on the dance trio of members William Bales, Jane Dudley, and Sophie Maslow. Manings's acumen as a teacher of modern dance earned her two engagements to teach in Cuba, both of which are documented in personal journals. Her leadership with the American Dance Guild and the ADG-sponsored gala celebrating the New Dance Group is also well documented in this collection.

  2. American Ballet Caravan music scores, 1935-1947

    180 items . 8 containers. 3.75 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection of American Ballet Caravan Music Scores consists of full scores, parts, piano rehearsal and vocal scores for six ballets, at least two of them unrealized, for Lincoln Kirstein's dance company, which he founded in 1936. Three of the six ballets were commissioned by Kirstein during the Caravan's tour to Latin America in 1941. The works are Pastorela (Paul Bowles); Soirées musicale (Benjamin Britten, arranged for two pianos by Brian Easdale); Estancia (Alberto E. Ginastera); Fantasias Brasileiras: no. 4, for piano and orchestra (Francisco Paulo Mignone); Cinco Piezas Brevas for string orchestra, op. 14 (Domingo Santa Cruz); Juke Box (Alec Wilder); and Concerto for two violins and orchestra (J. S. Bach, arranged for two pianos by Stefan Wolpe).

  3. Victoria Phillips collection, 1914-2011

    Approximately 3,914 items. 24 containers. 12 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Victoria Phillips (formerly Phillips Geduld), a historian and faculty member at Columbia University, specializes in Cold War history, cultural diplomacy, and international relations. The Victoria Phillips Collection includes materials assembled by the scholar during her doctoral research and other curatorial and research projects. Most of the 3,900-plus items are reproductions of newspaper articles, correspondence and financial reports, photographs, publications, interview notes and transcripts, and FBI files on artists and public figures. Copies of Phillips's publications based on this research are also included. Collection strengths include research on the Martha Graham Dance Company from 1942 to about 1960 (especially records of tours abroad) as well as New Dance Group performances and dancers.

  4. Grace McCrea papers relating to Denishawn, 1913-1969

    249 items . 6 containers. 3 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Grace McCrea (b. 1899) was a member of the Denishawn dance company led by modern dance pioneers Ruth St. Denis and Ted Shawn. Along with her older sister, Betty McCrea, she performed across the United States in Denishawn's vaudeville and concert tours from 1916-1919. The photographs, performance programs, and printed materials in this collection document the professional activities of Denishawn artistic leadership and company members from about 1913 to the late 1960s. The collection principally includes programs and photographs highlighting the career of dancer Grace McCrea and her sister Betty. Certain company members and artistic collaborators of the Denishawn company are also represented, such as Louis Horst, Betty Horst, Ada Forman, and Anne Douglas. The collection also includes magazine and newspaper clippings, publicity materials, and publications. Pages from two small notebooks document portions of the company's Asia tour and one piece of Denishawn choreography.

  5. Maxine Glorsky papers relating to Martha Graham, 1940-2019

    3,455 items. 31 containers. 18 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection of Maxine Glorsky focuses on her relationship with the Martha Graham Dance Company as its stage manager during the 1970s and early 1980s. It also incorporates substantial material from Jean Rosenthal, Graham’s lighting designer during the 1940s and 1950s. The collection includes many cue sheets for both stage management and lighting purposes, lighting plots, related technical materials, business papers for Glorsky’s Technical Assistance Group (TAG) Foundation and Rosenthal’s Theatre Production Service (TPS), correspondence, and a modest amount of publicity, news clippings, and programs.

  6. Cesi Kellinger collection of dance materials, 1842-1994

    approximately 220 items. 6 containers. 2.25 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Cesi Kellinger (1922-2014) was an antiquarian bookseller based in Pennsylvania. This collection consists of dance-related photographs, illustrations, books, promotional materials, performance programs, articles and clippings, and correspondence dating between 1842 and 1994. These items pertain to the careers of prominent dancers, choreographers, and educators, including Ruth St. Denis, Ted Shawn, and Martha Graham. Kellinger collected the items and donated them to the Library of Congress in 2011.

  7. Larry Warren collection on Anna Sokolow and Lester Horton, 1903-2007

    approximately 4,550 items. 15 containers. 9 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    This collection documents the research conducted by dancer, choreographer, and educator Larry Warren (1932-2009) while writing his biographies Lester Horton: Modern Dance Pioneer (1977) and Anna Sokolow: The Rebellious Spirit (1991). The clippings, correspondence, dance notation, interviews, notes, photographs, programs, scrapbooks, and writings collected or created by Warren reveal his process in capturing the lives of two major figures in twentieth-century modern dance and have the potential to shed new light on the lives and careers of these artists. The bulk of the collection is devoted to Warren's research on Sokolow, but there is also significant documentation on the movement technique Horton created and taught.

  8. Denishawn legacy collection, 1906-2019

    approximately 70 items. 2 containers. 1.4 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Denishawn, which modern dancers Ruth St. Denis (1879-1968) and Ted Shawn (1891-1972) founded in 1915, was a renowned dance company through which numerous prominent performers, including artists such as Martha Graham, Doris Humphrey and Charles Weidman, Louise Brooks, Anne Douglas, and Grace McCrea, received dance training and began their careers. The Denishawn Legacy Collection consists of programs, promotional materials, photographs, correspondence, articles, and scrapbook pages pertaining to the company and its members. These items also document the history and performances of Jacob’s Pillow, which Shawn founded in 1931 and directed until his death.

  9. 10 Hairy Legs dance company archive, 2012-2021

    approximately 2,940 electronic files (150 GB). -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    10 Hairy Legs (2012-2020), an all-male modern dance company based in northeastern New Jersey, was founded by Randy James. The company's archive consists entirely of digital records documenting performances, educational outreach programs, board of directors activities, video recordings of performances, and remembrances by dancers, administrators, and collaborators recorded following the company's dissolution in December 2020.

  10. Cherie Jorgensen collection on Jane Grossenbacher and Eleanor King, 1983-2005

    approximately 325 items. 3 containers. 1.75 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Eleanor King (1906-1991) was a modern dancer, choreographer, and educator who studied at Denishawn and joined the Humphrey-Weidman Company. Known for blending Eastern and Western influences in her choreography, she established her own company in Seattle and later taught at the University of Arkansas. Jane Grossenbacher (1951-2008) was a photographer who specialized in black-and white photogravures. The Cherie Jorgensen Collection on Jane Grossenbacher and Eleanor King consists chiefly of photographs that Grossenbacher took of King, as well as correspondence, an exhibit catalog, programs, and promotional materials that document their professional activities.