14 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Music publishing--United States.

  1. Laurindo Almeida papers, 1912-1995

    approximately 6,500 items . 84 containers. 35 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Laurindo Almeida was a Brazilian-American guitarist and composer. Often credited for contributions to the development of jazz samba, Almeida was a prolific composer and arranger of music for both classical Spanish guitar and popular guitar. He was an acclaimed recording artist and became the first person to win Grammy Awards for both classical and jazz performances. The collection contains manuscript and printed music, correspondence, publicity materials, sound and video recordings, photographs, and other items related to his distinguished career.

  2. Billy Strayhorn music manuscripts and estate papers, 1918-2015

    approximately 17,700 items. 86 containers. 39 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Billy Strayhorn (1915-1967) was an American jazz pianist, composer, arranger, and lyricist. He is prominently known as the leading arranger for the Duke Ellington Orchestra, a position that he held for nearly three decades. The collection chiefly contains scores, sketches, lead sheets, and parts for original compositions and arrangements by Strayhorn and Ellington, as well as business papers, photographs, scripts, and other materials pertaining to Strayhorn's life and the posthumous activities of his estate, Billy Strayhorn Songs, Inc.

  3. Irving Berlin collection, 1895-1990

    753,000 items. 932 containers. 703 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Irving Berlin was an American lyricist and composer of over 1,200 songs. He was also a music publisher, theater owner, and a founding member of the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP). The collection, which documents all aspects of his life and career, contains music scores, Berlin's handwritten and typewritten lyric sheets, publicity and promotional materials, personal and professional correspondence, photographs, business papers, legal and financial records, scrapbooks filled with press clippings, awards and honors, artwork and realia.

  4. Leo Feist collection, 1880-1930

    2,000 items. 18 containers. 6 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Leo Feist was an American music publisher. The collection primarily consists of a set of twenty-six bound volumes containing most of the music published by Leo Feist Inc., between the years of 1880 and 1930. These include approximately 2000 titles, mostly of popular music. The collection also includes vocal scores for Paoletta, Irene, and M. Beaucaire, as well as a Feist dance folio of popular music arranged for the piano.

  5. Elinor Remick Warren papers, 1872-2004

    approximately 8900 items. 85 containers. 30.0 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Elinor Remick Warren was an American pianist and composer. The collection contains materials relating to her life and career, including music manuscript scores and sketches, composition notebooks, and annotated printed editions of her work. The collection also contains Warren's business papers, biographical materials, personal correspondence, photographs, writings, scrapbooks, programs, diaries and notebooks, certificates, diplomas and honorary degrees, promotional brochures, and music publishers' catalogs that feature her works and performance activities.

  6. Society for American Music records, 1971-2001

    approximately 40,000 items. 115 containers. 49 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Society for American Music, an educational organization founded in 1975 by a group of American music enthusiasts, is dedicated to promoting the study, teaching, creation, and dissemination of music in the Americas. The society was originally named in honor of American musicologist, librarian, and editor Oscar G. T. Sonneck (1873-1928), the first critical scholar and bibliographer of American music, and first chief of the music division of the Library of Congress. The records range from the founding of the society to 1999, when it changed its name to the Society for American Music. Materials include correspondence, minutes, reports, memorandums, conference materials, bylaws, handbooks, committee records, publicity and promotional materials, financial papers, materials related to its publications American Music and Sonneck Society Bulletin, photographs and realia.

  7. Herman Langinger music publishing files, 1889-1972

    approximately 650 items. 12 containers. 4.0 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Herman Langinger was a music engraver, printer, and editor for New Music Society of California and other influential music publishers. The collection contains pre-publication and published music materials, including annotated manuscript and holograph scores and proof copies, as well as correspondence with composers and publishing associates. It also includes a comprehensive run of published editions from New Music and various editions from other publishers with whom Langinger worked, namely his own Golden West Music Press in Hollywood, Calif., Delkas Music Publishing Company, and Affiliated Musicians, Inc.

  8. Merle Montgomery papers, circa 1904-1983

    5093 items. 18 containers. 7.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Merle Montgomery was a music educator, composer, author, editor, administrator, translator, lecturer, and concert pianist. The collection primarily contains business papers and materials related to Montgomery's career and her leadership roles in various music, educational, and arts organizations, including Carl Fischer Inc., Mu Phi Epsilon, National Federation of Music Clubs, and the National Music Council. In addition, the collection includes personal and professional correspondence, biographical materials, photographs, programs, clippings, promotional and publicity materials, and publications.

  9. Harry Von Tilzer and H. Harold Gumm papers, 1878-1959

    approximately 11,000 items. 76 containers. 26.0 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Harry Von Tilzer and H. Harold Gumm Papers consist of both personal and professional papers of composer and music publisher Harry Von Tilzer (1872-1946) and his brother, H. Harold Gumm (1881 or 82-1973), who was a lawyer, agent, and producer in the entertainment business. After having served as attorney for the Harry Von Tilzer Music Publishing Co. (HVTMPC) for several decades, Harold Gumm served as executor of Harry Von Tilzer's estate and took over the company when Von Tilzer died in 1946. This collection contains the records of the HVTMPC which are inextricably combined not only with Harry Von Tilzer's papers but also with Gumm's papers and those of his firm Goldie & Gumm. Von Tilzer's personal papers include correspondence, writings, legal and financial documents, and drafts of his autobiography. The HVTMPC materials primarily consist of music (manuscript and printed), lyrics (manuscript and typewritten), scripts, legal and financial records, and a catalog of works published by HVTMPC. Most of Gumm's subject files relate to his activities as an agent for many prominent black performers of the 1930s and 1940s. Materials relating to their brothers (music publisher Will Von Tilzer; songwriter Albert Von Tilzer; and Jules and Jack Von Tilzer, who both worked in the family business) also appear in the collection. In addition, the collection contains programs, photographs, and clippings.

  10. Serge Koussevitzky archive, 1880-1978

    around 200,000 items. 505 containers. 224 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Serge Koussevitzky was a Russian-born conductor, composer, and double bassist. The archive includes correspondence, personal and business papers, photographs, writings, clippings, scrapbooks, programs, and other materials which serve as a record of Koussevitzky's life and career, and document some of the most significant aspects of twentieth-century music. Through his work as a conductor and publisher, and his efforts to commission new musical works, Koussevitzky maintained deep ties with many of the finest composers and musicians of the day. These figures are represented in their personal and professional affiliations with the conductor. The collection extensively chronicles periods in the history of organizations such as the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Berkshire Music Center, the Koussevitzky Music Foundation, and the American International Music Fund. Material in the collection dates from Koussevitzky's years in his native Russia and also contains material created after Koussevitzky's death, reflecting his widow Olga's continuing work with various organizations and projects. Musical compositions commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky are part of the Serge Koussevitzky Music Foundation Collection, and are shelved in ML30.3c, ML30.3c2, ML30.3c3, and ML30.3e2.