4 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Music--Brazil.

  1. Vida Chenoweth collection, circa 1940-2000

    15,686 items. 42 containers. 15.5 linear feet (31 containers).. 638 sound cassettes : analog.. 251 sound tape reels : analog ; various sizes.. 89 sound discs : analog ; various sizes.. 2 sound discs (CD-R) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.. 71 videocassettes (VHS and U-Matic) : color, sound ; 1/2 in and 3/4 in.. 5 videodiscs (DVD).. 10 film reels.. approximately 660 photographs : film negatives.. approximately 1200 photographic prints : black and white, color ; various sizes.. 730 slides ; color ; 35 mm.. 1177 half frame slides, mostly color.. 3 slides ; color ; 126.. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collection of papers and audiovisual materials representing the life work of ethnomusicologist Vida Chenoweth. Manuscripts, sound recordings, photographs, and films mainly of her work with the Usarufa and numerous other people in Papua New Guinea, but culture groups from other places are also represented, including Vanuatu, Indonesia, Solomon Islands, Cook Islands New Zealand, Kenya, Zaire, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Ivory Coast, Ghana, South Africa, Cameroon, Senegal, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Mali, Cameroon, Vietnam, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Mexico, Guatemala, Panama, Ecuador, Brazil, Peru, and the United States. Includes work done by her students at Wheaton College and colleagues at the Summer Institute of Linguistics. Includes recording logs, analysis, song transcriptions, song texts, theses, correspondence, Chenoweth's diaries (1980s), and field notes. Sound recordings include music and spoken word from various provinces in Papua New Guinea, such as Eastern and Western Highlands, Madang, Morobe, East New Britain, New Ireland, and Irian Jaya provinces. Moving images include Chenoweth family films, as well as documentation about music and practices from throughout Papua New Guinea, the Cook Islands, Vanuatu, and other regions. They also include content from the South Pacific Festival of the Arts in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea.

  2. Laurindo Almeida papers, 1912-1995

    approximately 6,500 items . 84 containers. 35 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Laurindo Almeida was a Brazilian-American guitarist and composer. Often credited for contributions to the development of jazz samba, Almeida was a prolific composer and arranger of music for both classical Spanish guitar and popular guitar. He was an acclaimed recording artist and became the first person to win Grammy Awards for both classical and jazz performances. The collection contains manuscript and printed music, correspondence, publicity materials, sound and video recordings, photographs, and other items related to his distinguished career.

  3. Luiz Heitor Corrêa de Azevedo collection on Latin American folklore, 1904-1986

    174 published items. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collected publications pertaining to Latin American folklore and musical traditions from the library of Luiz Heitor Corrêa de Azevedo, Brazilian folklorist and musicologist.

  4. Discoteca Pública Municipal de São Paulo collection, 1937-1943

    1184 items; 4 containers; 2 linear feet.. 7 folders (1 box).. 215 sound discs : analog, 78 rpm ; 10 in., 12 in., 16 in.. 359 photographic prints : black and white ; 2 3/4 in. x 1 3/4 in.. 259 photographic prints : black and white ; 3 1/2 in. x 4 3/4 in.. 1 film reel (1445 ft.) : silent, black and white ; 16 mm.. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    An ethnographic field collection of sound recordings, moving images, photographs, and accompanying materials that document religious and secular music, dance, and ritual in the northeastern Brazilian states of Maranhão, Pará, Paraíba, Pernambuco, and also the state of São Paulo. Fieldwork was conducted in northeastern Brazil in 1937-1938, some audio recordings were accessioned in 1950. The collection includes correspondence between Harold Spivacke, then chief of the Music Division of the Library of Congress and Oneyda Alvarenga, Director of the Discoteca Pública Municipal de São Paulo (1941-1943), now Discoteca Oneyda Alvarenga (Centro Cultural São Paulo). Photographs document field research and include images of musical instruments and costumes in the museum in São Paulo. Silent black-and-white 16 mm film is comprised of 14 film rolls including footage of carnaval in Recife, Pernambuco; footage from Belém do Pará; most was filmed in Paraíba.