8 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Music--Instruction and study.

  1. Wanda Landowska and Denise Restout papers, 1843-2002

    approximately 41,000 items. 255 containers. 117.0 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Wanda Landowska was a Polish keyboardist, composer, and teacher best known for revitalizing harpsichord performance in the twentieth century. Her school at Saint-Leu-la-Forêt, founded in 1925, became one of the great centers for the collection, study, and performance of Baroque music until it was looted by the Nazis in 1940. The collection consists of annotated music, correspondence, business papers, writings, programs, photographs, and other materials that document the legacy of Landowska. These materials largely reflect the activities of Landowska and her pupil, Denise Restout, during their years at Saint-Leu and after their immigration to the United States in 1941.

  2. Mildred Spiegel Zucker collection of Leonard Bernstein correspondence and related materials, 1936-1991

    135 items. 1 container. 0.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Music teacher Mildred Spiegel Zucker was a childhood friend of Leonard Bernstein's, with whom she maintained a lifelong friendship. The collection mostly consists of correspondence that Bernstein sent to Zucker dating from his time as a counselor at Camp Onata, as a student at the Curtis Institute of Music, and during the beginning of his career in New York.

  3. Mary Amanda Dixon Jones papers, 1839-1925

    2,000 items. 8 containers. 3.0 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Physician. Family papers, correspondence, legal papers, financial papers, lectures, notes, writings, medical illustrations, newspaper clippings, photographs, and printed matter relating primarily to Dixon Jones’s medical career.

  4. Louise Talma papers, 1861-1998

    approximately 38,000 items. 160 containers. 81.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Louise Talma was an American composer, pianist, and teacher. She was a student of Nadia Boulanger and a long-time resident of Fontainebleau and the MacDowell Colony in Peterborough, New Hampshire. The collection consists of music manuscripts, harmony and teaching materials, correspondence, photographs, business papers, clippings, programs, publicity materials, writings, awards and other materials related to her career and her family's history.

  5. Hodges family collection, circa 1790-circa 1909

    around 430 items. 64 boxes. 16 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection contains manuscript and printed music, writings, and other materials compiled and collected by Edward Hodges and subsequently by his son, John Sebastian Bach Hodges. Noteworthy among Edward Hodges' writings are the Annuary, an attempt in later life to depict his earlier life, and documents relating to the design and construction of the 1846 Erben organ at Trinity Church in New York. Music scores and sketches of the collection may well be the largest extant source of Hodges' manuscript music, including both original music and transcriptions and arrangements of the works of others, mostly intended for performance during religious services. In addition, the collection includes manuscript and printed scores for the works of two of Edward Hodges' children, Faustina Hasse Hodges and John Sebastian Bach Hodges. Sacred music in the collection not composed by Hodges family members provides insight into the kind of music that was typically performed in Episcopal churches in this country during the 19th and early 20th centuries: chants, psalm and hymn tunes, litanies, introits, offertories, oratorios, etc. Especially interesting are the Breitkopf & Härtel publications of Haydn's Die Worte des Erlösers am Kreuze from 1801 and an early publication of Beethoven's Christus am Oldberge. Among the scores of secular music, John Stafford Smith's Musica Antiqua (London, 1812), an anthology of music from the 13th through the 18th centuries, is particularly noteworthy, as is Chant lyrique pour l'inauguration de la statue votée à sa Majesté l'empereur et roi by Etienne Méhul. The collection also includes sixteen volumes of late 18th and 19th century sheet music that were presumably compiled by one or more members of the Hodges family.

  6. Merle Montgomery papers, circa 1904-1983

    5093 items. 18 containers. 7.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Merle Montgomery was a music educator, composer, author, editor, administrator, translator, lecturer, and concert pianist. The collection primarily contains business papers and materials related to Montgomery's career and her leadership roles in various music, educational, and arts organizations, including Carl Fischer Inc., Mu Phi Epsilon, National Federation of Music Clubs, and the National Music Council. In addition, the collection includes personal and professional correspondence, biographical materials, photographs, programs, clippings, promotional and publicity materials, and publications.

  7. Serge Koussevitzky archive, 1880-1978

    around 200,000 items. 505 containers. 224 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Serge Koussevitzky was a Russian-born conductor, composer, and double bassist. The archive includes correspondence, personal and business papers, photographs, writings, clippings, scrapbooks, programs, and other materials which serve as a record of Koussevitzky's life and career, and document some of the most significant aspects of twentieth-century music. Through his work as a conductor and publisher, and his efforts to commission new musical works, Koussevitzky maintained deep ties with many of the finest composers and musicians of the day. These figures are represented in their personal and professional affiliations with the conductor. The collection extensively chronicles periods in the history of organizations such as the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Berkshire Music Center, the Koussevitzky Music Foundation, and the American International Music Fund. Material in the collection dates from Koussevitzky's years in his native Russia and also contains material created after Koussevitzky's death, reflecting his widow Olga's continuing work with various organizations and projects. Musical compositions commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky are part of the Serge Koussevitzky Music Foundation Collection, and are shelved in ML30.3c, ML30.3c2, ML30.3c3, and ML30.3e2.

  8. Grace and Gustave Schirmer correspondence and other papers, 1845-1949

    227 items. 1 container. .5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Gustave Schirmer (1864-1907) was the son of famed German-born music publisher Gustav Schirmer (1829-1893). Gustave is known for establishing Boston Music Co. in 1885 and for filling leadership roles in his father’s business, G. Schirmer Inc., from the early 1880s until his death in 1907. He and his wife Grace were very active within the music community and maintained relationships with prominent composers, musicians, and artists worldwide. This collection chiefly consists of their correspondence with these individuals, but also contains clippings, programs, biographical materials, and more.