77 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Music--Manuscripts.

  1. Hodges family collection, circa 1790-circa 1909

    around 430 items. 64 boxes. 16 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection contains manuscript and printed music, writings, and other materials compiled and collected by Edward Hodges and subsequently by his son, John Sebastian Bach Hodges. Noteworthy among Edward Hodges' writings are the Annuary, an attempt in later life to depict his earlier life, and documents relating to the design and construction of the 1846 Erben organ at Trinity Church in New York. Music scores and sketches of the collection may well be the largest extant source of Hodges' manuscript music, including both original music and transcriptions and arrangements of the works of others, mostly intended for performance during religious services. In addition, the collection includes manuscript and printed scores for the works of two of Edward Hodges' children, Faustina Hasse Hodges and John Sebastian Bach Hodges. Sacred music in the collection not composed by Hodges family members provides insight into the kind of music that was typically performed in Episcopal churches in this country during the 19th and early 20th centuries: chants, psalm and hymn tunes, litanies, introits, offertories, oratorios, etc. Especially interesting are the Breitkopf & Härtel publications of Haydn's Die Worte des Erlösers am Kreuze from 1801 and an early publication of Beethoven's Christus am Oldberge. Among the scores of secular music, John Stafford Smith's Musica Antiqua (London, 1812), an anthology of music from the 13th through the 18th centuries, is particularly noteworthy, as is Chant lyrique pour l'inauguration de la statue votée à sa Majesté l'empereur et roi by Etienne Méhul. The collection also includes sixteen volumes of late 18th and 19th century sheet music that were presumably compiled by one or more members of the Hodges family.

  2. John Alden Carpenter collection, 1891-1961

    around 1,700 items. 12 boxes. 5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    John Alden Carpenter was an American composer. The collection contains music materials, primarily holograph manuscripts of Carpenter's songs, chamber and orchestral pieces, and dramatic works; correspondence; writings; photographs and artwork; biographical materials; certificates and honors; programs; clippings; and scrapbooks.

  3. Fritz Kreisler collection, 1845-1969

    around 1,800 items. 26 boxes. 16 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Fritz Kreisler was an Austrian-born American violinist and composer. The collection contains Kreisler's original compositions in sketch, manuscript (including holographs), and printed form. In addition, it contains manuscript and heavily annotated printed copies of Kreisler's transcriptions of other composers' music. It also contains correspondence, financial and legal documents, programs, clippings, writings, photographs, awards and honors. The collection includes the papers of Kreisler's biographer Louis Lochner, which contain Kreisler's personal papers and material related to the biography.

  4. Vernon Duke collection, 1918-1968

    around 17,500 items. 146 boxes. 52 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Vernon Duke (born Vladimir Dukelsky) was an American composer and songwriter. He rose to success in the 1930s with hit songs such as "April in Paris" and "Autumn in New York" and later collaborated with many leading composers and lyricists of the period, including George and Ira Gershwin, Serge Prokofiev, and Serge Koussevitzky. The collection contains manuscript and printed music, correspondence, subject files, photographs, and other materials related to his career.

  5. Geraldine Farrar papers, 1895-1960s

    approximately 25,000 items. 67 boxes. 28.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Geraldine Farrar was an American opera singer and film actress. The collection consists of Farrar's personal papers relating to her life and career, including correspondence, scrapbooks and clippings, photographs and music materials containing sketches, autograph manuscripts, and printed music composed or edited by Farrar. In addition, the collection contains biographical materials, Farrar's writings, contracts, radio scripts, concert programs, awards, and other miscellaneous items.

  6. Ludwig Zenk music manuscripts, 1930-1947

    31 items. 3 containers. 2.0 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    This collection principally consists of holograph music manuscripts, sketches, and printed scores by Austrian composer Ludwig Zenk.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  7. Henryk Szeryng collection, 1933-1988

    approximately 11,000 items. 169 containers. 75 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection documents the life and career of violinist Henryk Szeryng (1918-1988) who was also known as a teacher, patron of the arts and cultural ambassador. The collection contains printed and holograph manuscript scores, writings, teaching materials, correspondence, personal and business papers, performance files and programs, photographs, clippings, scrapbooks, publicity material, awards, and books.

  8. Ethel L. Voynich papers, 1928-1948

    approximately 800 items. 14 containers. 6.0 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Ethel Lillian Voynich (1864-1960) was a social activist, novelist, translator, and composer. Voynich's musical compositions, based principally on sacred or poetic texts, are represented by holograph manuscript scores, sketches, lyric sheets, printed music, and notes. The remaining materials consist of subject files on musicological topics, research materials, and a handful of programs.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  9. Otto Klemperer archive, 1792-1988

    20,000 items. 111 containers. 29 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Conductor and composer. The archive documents Otto Klemperer's life and career. It contains manuscript and printed music, correspondence, family papers, writings by and about Klemperer, interviews, legal and financial documents, clippings, programs, photographic materials, materials related to the Kroll Opera, and books annotated by Klemperer and his daughter Lotte. The archive also contains production and resource materials, including scripts, interviews, background materials, and photographs, that Philo Bregstein used in making a documentary film about Klemperer's life and work.

  10. Harold Spivacke collection, 1923-1984

    approximately 3,900 items. 33 containers. 13 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Harold Spivacke was a music librarian, administrator, musicologist, and musician. He was chief of the Library of Congress Music Division for thirty-five years, from 1937 until 1972. The collection contains materials relating to his life and career, including correspondence, student notebooks, speeches, his dissertation, photographs, clippings, programs, manuscript and printed music, artwork, awards and honorary degrees, and business papers.