80 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Music--Manuscripts.

  1. Laurindo Almeida papers, 1912-1995

    approximately 6,500 items . 84 containers. 35 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Laurindo Almeida was a Brazilian-American guitarist and composer. Often credited for contributions to the development of jazz samba, Almeida was a prolific composer and arranger of music for both classical Spanish guitar and popular guitar. He was an acclaimed recording artist and became the first person to win Grammy Awards for both classical and jazz performances. The collection contains manuscript and printed music, correspondence, publicity materials, sound and video recordings, photographs, and other items related to his distinguished career.

  2. Max Roach papers, 1880-2012

    approximately 98,750 items. 195 containers. 122 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Max Roach was an American jazz drummer, composer, educator, and activist. The collection includes music manuscripts, writings, correspondence, business papers, photographs, programs, sound recordings, and other materials related to his career. It also contains a variety of materials pertaining to vocalist Abbey Lincoln and countless other jazz artists, including Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, Charles Mingus, and Charlie Parker.

  3. American Ballet Caravan music scores, 1935-1947

    180 items . 8 containers. 3.75 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection of American Ballet Caravan Music Scores consists of full scores, parts, piano rehearsal and vocal scores for six ballets, at least two of them unrealized, for Lincoln Kirstein's dance company, which he founded in 1936. Three of the six ballets were commissioned by Kirstein during the Caravan's tour to Latin America in 1941. The works are Pastorela (Paul Bowles); Soirées musicale (Benjamin Britten, arranged for two pianos by Brian Easdale); Estancia (Alberto E. Ginastera); Fantasias Brasileiras: no. 4, for piano and orchestra (Francisco Paulo Mignone); Cinco Piezas Brevas for string orchestra, op. 14 (Domingo Santa Cruz); Juke Box (Alec Wilder); and Concerto for two violins and orchestra (J. S. Bach, arranged for two pianos by Stefan Wolpe).

  4. Sophie Maslow papers, 1918-1997

    1,216 items . 18 containers. 8 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Sophie Maslow (1911-2006) was an American modern dancer, choreographer, and teacher. The collection consists of photographs, programs, promotional materials, clippings, articles, correspondence, writings, music scores, and other documents pertaining to Maslow’s career. The material includes documentation of her time as a performer with the Martha Graham Dance Company, and primarily features her work with the New Dance Group, the Dudley-Maslow-Bales Trio, and the Sophie Maslow Dance Company. The collection illustrates her interest in American folk, Jewish, populist, and communist themes.

  5. Ruggiero Ricci papers, 1890s-2013

    5,600 items. 70 containers. 28 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Ruggiero Ricci (1918-2012) was an American violinist and teacher. The collection, which documents his performing and teaching career, contains manuscript and printed music, correspondence, business and financial papers, promotional materials, photographs, scrapbooks, and other materials.

  6. Lord Saltoun collection of guitar music, 1810-1850

    approximately 100 items. 4 containers. 1 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection consists almost entirely of music manuscripts, most of which are in the hand of copyists, although the pieces dedicated to Lord Saltoun may be autograph manuscripts. There are approximately sixty compositions, including many arrangements and original works for guitar in various ensemble settings, several pieces for solo guitar, and a few short piano pieces.

  7. Francis Maria Scala papers, 1816-2013

    Approximately 900 items. 40 containers. 15.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Francis Maria Scala was an Italian-born naturalized American military band director, musician, and composer. The first musician to lead the United States Marine Corps (USMC) Band, Scala was one of its most influential directors. During his tenure from 1855 to 1871, he increased the size of the band, improved and enlarged its repertoire, enhanced its popularity through public outdoor concerts, and provided balanced instrumentation of both woodwinds and brass which set the groundwork for the improvements made under John Philip Sousa. The collection consists primarily of manuscript and printed music arranged or composed by Francis Scala for band concerts, military formations, and White House functions. It also includes photographs, clippings, programs, promotional materials, correspondence, and other materials.

  8. Selma Epstein collection, 1931-1987

    72 items. 5 containers. 2.6 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Selma Epstein (1927-2014) was a concert pianist, teacher, promoter of contemporary music, and champion of 20th-century black and female composers. The collection contains contemporary music scores, many by women and African-American composers, as well as a small amount of clippings and promotional materials.

  9. Oliver Daniel papers, 1759-1997

    21,600 items. 80 containers. 52.0 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Oliver Daniel was an American arts administrator, musicologist, radio director and producer, and composer. The collection includes correspondence, manuscript and printed scores, photographs, programs, clippings, scrapbooks and periodicals.

  10. National Negro Opera Company collection, 1879-1997

    11,250 items. 68 containers. 39 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The National Negro Opera Company, the first African-American opera company in the United States, was founded in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1941, by Mary Cardwell Dawson. The collection contains materials and records related to the company and to Dawson. It includes correspondence, administrative and financial records, photographs, programs, promotional and publicity materials, scrapbooks, clippings, address books, notebooks, music, and books. In addition, the collection contains materials related to opera singer La Julia Rhea, who performed with the company, and Walter M. Dawson, Mary Cardwell Dawson's husband, who worked for the company.