338 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Music.

  1. Ralph Ellison papers, 1890-2005

    74,800 items. 314 containers plus 25 oversize. 143 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    African-American author and educator. General correspondence, organizational correspondence and reports, family papers, drafts, notes, and production files for novels, essays, poetry, short stories, reviews, and other writings, speeches, lectures, and interviews, reference file, and miscellany documenting Ellison's career and development as a writer. Among the many works represented are Going to the Territory (1985), Invisible Man (1952), Shadow and Act (1964), and the second novel Ellison left unpublished at his death.

  2. Mary Elizabeth Hallock Greenewalt papers, 1918-1942

    1,000 items. 2 containers plus 1 oversize. .8 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Musician, inventor, and author. Correspondence, speeches, legal and financial records, draft of a book, biographical data, printed matter, and annotated photographs primarily relating to Greenewalt's invention of an art form called Nourathar (also Sarabet, Light-Score) that harmonized projected patterns of colored light with concert music.

  3. National Society of Arts and Letters records, 1944-1987

    3,700 items. 42 containers. 11 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Nonprofit educational organization dedicated to the support of young artists in the performing, literary, and visual arts. Correspondence; minutes of meetings; copies of the society's publications, The Record of the National Society of Arts and Letters and the Year Book and Roster; programs; clippings; printed matter; scrapbooks; photographs; and other records relating primarily to the society's program of awards and scholarships promoting careers in art, dance, literature, music, and theater. Includes separate records of the Washington, D.C., Chapter of the society.

  4. Charles Edward Russell papers, 1864-1941

    12,000 items. 53 containers. 16 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Author and journalist. Correspondence, diaries, notebooks, writings, subject files, scrapbooks, clippings, printed matter, and other papers relating principally to Russell's writings and to his activities on behalf of various progressive reform causes.

  5. Sid Yudain papers, 1934-2014

    3,500 items. 10 containers plus 2 oversize. 5 linear feet. 10 digital files (3.07 GB). -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Journalist and editor. Correspondence, writings, speeches, articles, clippings, notes, photographs, newspapers, and other papers relating primarily to Yudain's career as the founder and publisher of Roll Call.

  6. W. Edwards Deming papers, 1795-1994

    58,000 items. 166 containers plus 1 classified. 70 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Statistician and educator. Correspondence, memoranda, reports, articles, speeches, lectures, interviews, reviews, books, writings, musical scores, photographs, and other papers documenting Deming's government service at the United States Bureau of the Budget and Bureau of the Census; his academic positions at George Washington University, New York University, and the United States Department of Agriculture Graduate School; and his career as a consultant in statistical studies and management in the United States and abroad in which he advocated the application of statistical quality control in industry.

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  7. Moldenhauer archives at the Library of Congress, circa 1000-circa 1990

    approximately 3,750 items. 131 boxes. 206 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Moldenhauer Archives consist of manuscript and printed music, correspondence, photographs, books, clippings, programs, and artwork dating from the twelfth to the twentieth century. The music includes holograph scores and sketches, as well as a number of copyist and printed scores, transcriptions, and arrangements. Represented musical and literary figures include, among many others, George Auric, Johann Sebastian Bach, Béla Bartók, Ludwig van Beethoven, Hector Berlioz, Georges Bizet, Ernst Bloch, Pierre Boulez, Johannes Brahms, Anton Bruckner, Feruccio Busoni, Frédéric Chopin, Claude Debussy, George Frideric Handel, Hermann Hesse, György Ligeti, Felix Mendelssohn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Giacomo Puccini, Maurice Ravel, Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, Arnold Schoenberg, Anton Webern, Kurt Weill, and Gioseffo Zarlino.

  8. Record industry publicity collection, 1937-1979

    21.75 linear feet (41 boxes and 8 oversize folders, approximately 17,900 items). -- Recorded Sound Research Center, Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Press releases, record catalogs, radio program scripts, promotional posters, monthly publications about new record releases, and other materials advertising sound recordings.

  9. Playbills, research materials, and other papers from the David G. Hummel American musical theatre collection, 1905-2005

    approximately 14,000 items. 101 containers. 42 linear feet. -- Recorded Sound Research Center, Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The papers consist of approximately 2,800 original playbills, plus extensive research materials and data sheets covering the historical breadth of American musical theatre.

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  10. Program notes from the Voice of America Music Library Collection, 1946-1988

    23 linear feet (55 boxes, approximately 19,250 items). -- Recorded Sound Research Center, Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    United States international broadcaster bureau founded in 1942. Programs and program notes make up the largest portion of the collection, along with press releases, promotional materials, audition notes, and scripts to document the programming of the VOA.

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