37 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Musical sketches.

  1. Halsey Stevens papers, circa 1920-1987

    approximately 2,500 items. 51 containers. 20.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Halsey Stevens was an American composer, musicologist, and teacher. He is best known for his chamber music works and published monograph, The Life and Music of Béla Bartók. The collection contains music manuscripts, writings, research materials, programs, correspondence, and other materials related to his projects. Only the music materials are available online at this time. These materials consist of scores, parts, and sketches for instrumental works for keyboard, chamber ensemble, and full orchestra, as well as vocal and choral works and arrangements for varying instrumentations.

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    Some or all content stored offsite.

  2. William B. Bradbury collection, 1846-1928

    circa 40 items. 3 boxes. 1 linear foot. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Bradbury's secular music is represented by published vocal scores, some in photocopy, and probable holograph of Song of the South. Contains an album compiled by Bradbury in Europe (1847-1849) of autograph musical sketches by Franz Abt, Niels Gade, Joseph Joachim, Jenny Lind, Albert Lortzing, Giacomo Meyerbeer, Ignaz Moscheles, Clara Schumann, Robert Schumann, Louis Spohr, Richard Wagner, and others; sketches by Felix Mendelssohn, Walter Damrosch, and Ignace Paderewski added later. Photographs, clippings, printed and ms. music by other composers, correspondence, Bradbury's baton, etc. also are included.

  3. Moldenhauer archives at the Library of Congress, circa 1000-circa 1990

    3,600 items. 131 boxes. 206 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The archives consist primarily of music (both manuscript and printed), correspondence, photographs, sound recordings, books, newspaper clippings, printed programs, drawings, and engravings. They span years from the Middle Ages to the present, and include documents of composers, musicians, and literary figures, among others. The music in the collection includes holograph scores or sketches, both published and unpublished, as well as a number of copyists' and printed scores, transcriptions, and arrangements by composers and musicians such as Beethoven, Bloch, Brahms, Chopin, Franck, Mendelssohn, Puccini, Rimsky-Korsakov, Schoenberg, Webern, and many others. Also included is historically important correspondence, such as letters of Metastasio and Handel. Some composers (Arnold Schoenberg and Anton Webern, for example) are represented by numerous manuscripts. A sample of other composers, musicians, and literary figures that are represented by both music and nonmusical materials includes George Auric, Johann Sebastian Bach, Béla Bartók, Hector Berlioz, Georges Bizet, Pierre Boulez, Anton Bruckner, Charles Burney, Feruccio Busoni, Claude Debussy, Frederick Delius, Hermann Hesse, György Ligeti, Federico Garca Lorca, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Marice Ravel, Rainer Maria Rilke, Frank Wedekind, Kurt Weill, and Gioseffo Zarlino.

  4. Margaret ("Peggie") Dwight collection on Luigi Dallapiccola, 1936-1995

    1,150 items . 12 boxes . 6 linear feet . -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Luigi Dallapiccola (1904-1975) was an Italian composer known for his twelve-tone compossitions. The collection contains Dallapiccola's correspondence with Margaret (Peggie) Dwight, including more than 300 letters (written mostly in French) as well as postcards and telegrams. In addition, there are more than 200 articles and programs relating to Dallapiccola's career, most of them collected during those years. The collection also includes a few of Dallapiccola's holograph music manuscripts, most notably his opera Ulisse (Ulysses), excerpts or sketches of his works, and published editions of two full scores for Requiescant and Sex Carmina Alcaei.

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    Some or all content stored offsite.

  5. Ernst Bacon collection, 1898-1990

    approximately 6,000 items. 54 boxes. 16 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Ernst Bacon was an American composer, pianist, and conductor. Largely a self-taught composer, Bacon also became an esteemed administrator and educator, serving as director of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) Federal Music Project in 1935 and later as composer-in-residence at Syracuse University from 1947-1963. The collection contains music, writings, correspondence, iconography, programs, clippings, publicity materials, and other miscellaneous items.

  6. Jerome Kern collection, 1905-1951

    approximately 7,470 items. 102 boxes. 45 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection consists primarily of Kern's show music and holograph sketches, most of which are manuscript full and vocal scores of Kern's orchestrators and arrangers, especially Frank Saddler and Robert Russell Bennett. Film and other music is also represented, as well as a small amount of correspondence.

  7. Richard Rodgers collection, 1917-1980

    around 2,700 items. 45 boxes. 20 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection primarily consists of Rodgers' music holographs--sketches, vocal scores (many with lyric sheets) and short scores. In addition, the collection includes full scores for eight of the Rodgers and Hammerstein shows. The collection also includes a small number of programs, photographs, miscellaneous papers, and other items.

  8. Henry Cowell music manuscripts, 1909-1965

    approximately 1,100 items. 37 containers plus bound scores. 18 linear feet . 10 microfilm reels. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Henry Cowell was an American composer, theorist, writer, pianist, and teacher. A member of the 1920s "ultra-modernists," Cowell's experimental compositions explored a myriad of unusual instrumental techniques and non-Western musical sounds. Works such as The Aeolian Harp (1923), The Banshee (1925), and Mosaic Quartet (1935) are seminal examples of his exploration of 'tone clusters,' or secondal harmonies, for expanding the musical sound palette. Cowell was also a prolific writer and editor who founded The New Music Quarterly in 1927 as an outlet for the musical works of modern composers. This finding aid collates classed holograph manuscript scores, sketches, and parts by Cowell that were donated to the Music Division beginning in the 1950s.

  9. Elliott Carter music manuscripts and other papers, 1933-1971

    approximately 18,900 items. 55 containers plus bound scores. 19 linear feet. 22 microfilm reels. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Among other accolades, American composer Elliott Carter was a two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Music for his second and third string quartets. A student of Nadia Boulanger, his works combined American and European styles of modernism, and his compositional style, based around collections of pitches, was later described as musical set theory. Carter was also known for his use of proportional tempo changes, which is referred to by scholars as metric modulation. Carter composed in a wide variety of genres, including symphonies, concertos, chamber music, ballets, and choral music. This finding aid collates classed holograph scores, sketches, and parts by Carter that were donated to the Music Division beginning in the 1960s. Additional music materials, programs, and a small amount of photographs and other papers will be added to this document in the future.

  10. Erich Wolfgang Korngold collection, 1889-2008

    approximately 9,000 items . 97 containers. 45 linear feet. 17 microfilm reels. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Erich Wolfgang Korngold was a composer and pianist noted for his orchestral works, operas, concertos, film scores, piano music, and chamber music. A musical prodigy, he famously displayed immense talent for both performance and composition. Korngold and his family were part of the exodus of European artists who moved to the United States during the rise of Nazism in Europe. He lived and worked in Hollywood, California, until his death in 1957. The Erich Wolfgang Korngold Collection consists primarily of holograph and copyist music manuscripts that span his entire compositional output, as well as sketches, fragments, libretti, and film cue sheets. Many works not in Korngold's hand include his annotations. The collection also contains non-music materials such as correspondence, financial papers, photographs, and programs.