19 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Musicians--Correspondence.

  1. Lewis Nathaniel Chase papers, 1836-1947

    89,000 items. 224 containers. 89.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Editor, author, and educator. Autographed letters and correspondence with poets, writers, artists, musicians, and actors; family papers; and miscellaneous personal and academic material stemming from Chase's career as a writer and university professor.

  2. Julius Gold collection, 1858-1964

    approximately 8,000 items. 22 boxes. 9 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Manuscripts of Gold's theoretical writings, including unpublished translations of and commentaries on the writings of Bernhard Ziehn. Includes correspondence with colleagues Hans Joachim Moser, Lloyd Hibberd, and John Alden Carpenter; and students Winthrop Sargent, Frank Fragale, Meredith Willson, and Isaac Stern. The collection also contains programs, printed music, finanancial and legal papers, and photographs.

  3. William B. Bradbury collection, 1846-1928

    circa 40 items. 3 boxes. 1 linear foot. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Bradbury's secular music is represented by published vocal scores, some in photocopy, and probable holograph of Song of the South. Contains an album compiled by Bradbury in Europe (1847-1849) of autograph musical sketches by Franz Abt, Niels Gade, Joseph Joachim, Jenny Lind, Albert Lortzing, Giacomo Meyerbeer, Ignaz Moscheles, Clara Schumann, Robert Schumann, Louis Spohr, Richard Wagner, and others; sketches by Felix Mendelssohn, Walter Damrosch, and Ignace Paderewski added later. Photographs, clippings, printed and ms. music by other composers, correspondence, Bradbury's baton, etc. also are included.

  4. Moldenhauer archives at the Library of Congress, circa 1000-circa 1990

    3,600 items. 131 boxes. 206 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The archives consist primarily of music (both manuscript and printed), correspondence, photographs, sound recordings, books, newspaper clippings, printed programs, drawings, and engravings. They span years from the Middle Ages to the present, and include documents of composers, musicians, and literary figures, among others. The music in the collection includes holograph scores or sketches, both published and unpublished, as well as a number of copyists' and printed scores, transcriptions, and arrangements by composers and musicians such as Beethoven, Bloch, Brahms, Chopin, Franck, Mendelssohn, Puccini, Rimsky-Korsakov, Schoenberg, Webern, and many others. Also included is historically important correspondence, such as letters of Metastasio and Handel. Some composers (Arnold Schoenberg and Anton Webern, for example) are represented by numerous manuscripts. A sample of other composers, musicians, and literary figures that are represented by both music and nonmusical materials includes George Auric, Johann Sebastian Bach, Béla Bartók, Hector Berlioz, Georges Bizet, Pierre Boulez, Anton Bruckner, Charles Burney, Feruccio Busoni, Claude Debussy, Frederick Delius, Hermann Hesse, György Ligeti, Federico Garca Lorca, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Marice Ravel, Rainer Maria Rilke, Frank Wedekind, Kurt Weill, and Gioseffo Zarlino.

  5. Jascha Heifetz papers, 1786-1991

    approximately 17, 500 items. 280 boxes. 52 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Russian-American musician Jascha Heifetz was a virtuosic violinist who became a dedicated teacher. The collection includes his personal music library of original compositions, arrangements, and transcriptions. Concert programs document his performances from 1911 to 1974, and photographs, photo albums, and scrapbooks span the violinist's entire life. The correspondence contains letters from significant twentieth-century musical figures such as Leopold Auer, Benjamin Britten, Sergei Prokofiev, George Bernard Shaw, and Sir William Walton.

  6. Jacobo Ficher collection, 1864-1997

    approximately 6,000 items. 66 boxes. 72 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection comprises practically all the composer's works, mainly holograph manuscript scores in all major categories of composition. It also includes documents, correspondence (to and from Leonard Bernstein, Carlos Chávez, Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge, Aaron Copland, Henry Cowell, Vivian Fine, Alberto Ginastera, Paul Kletzki, Nicolai Malko, Eugene Ormandy, Arthur Rubinstein, Nicolas Slonimsky, Leopold Stokowski, and others), writings, programs, and scrapbooks.

  7. Serge Koussevitzky archive, 1880-1978

    around 200,000 items. 505 containers. 224 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Serge Koussevitzky was a Russian-born conductor, composer, and double bassist. The archive includes correspondence, personal and business papers, photographs, writings, clippings, scrapbooks, programs, and other materials which serve as a record of Koussevitzky's life and career, and document some of the most significant aspects of twentieth-century music. Through his work as a conductor and publisher, and his efforts to commission new musical works, Koussevitzky maintained deep ties with many of the finest composers and musicians of the day. These figures are represented in their personal and professional affiliations with the conductor. The collection extensively chronicles periods in the history of organizations such as the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Berkshire Music Center, the Koussevitzky Music Foundation, and the American International Music Fund. Material in the collection dates from Koussevitzky's years in his native Russia and also contains material created after Koussevitzky's death, reflecting his widow Olga's continuing work with various organizations and projects. Musical compositions commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky are part of the Serge Koussevitzky Music Foundation Collection, and are shelved in ML30.3c, ML30.3c2, ML30.3c3, and ML30.3e2.

  8. Aaron Copland collection, 1841-1991

    around 400,000 items. 563 boxes. 306 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Aaron Copland Collection consists of published and unpublished music by Copland and other composers, correspondence, writings, biographical material, datebooks, journals, professional papers including legal and financial material, photographs, awards, art work, and books. Of particular interest is the correspondence with Nadia Boulanger, which extent over 50 years, and with his long-time friend, Harold Clurman. Other significant correspondents are Leonard Bernstein, Paul Bowles, Benjamin Britten, Carlos Chávez, David Diamond, Roy Harris, Charles Ives, Claire Reis, Arnold Schoenberg, Roger Sessions, and Virgil Thomson. The photographic collection of Copland's friend and confidant Victor Kraft, a professional photographer, forms part of the collection.

  9. Glenn Dillard Gunn papers, 1802-1961

    approximately 750 items. 14 boxes. 4.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Glenn Dillard Gunn was an American pianist, conductor, music critic, and teacher. The collection contains correspondence from notable musical figures such as Ferruccio Busoni, Teresa Careño, Percy Grainger, and Moriz Rosenthal, as well as writings by and about Gunn, photographs, annotated printed scores, scrapbooks, and other items that document Gunn's life and career.

  10. Art Buchwald papers, 1885-2007

    83,000 items. 236 containers plus 22 oversize. 99 linear feet. 4,084 digital files (42.27 GB). -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Humorist, political commentator, and playwright. Correspondence, columns, book manuscripts, speeches, plays, screenplays, biographical material, photographs, audiovisual material, digital files, posters, memorabilia, drawings, appointment calendars, address books, artifacts, copyright registration and renewals, legal documents, financial records, and clippings documenting Buchwald's career as a columnist and his personal life.