10 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Opera.

  1. John Secrist Jr. papers, 1919-1973

    5.75 linear feet (18 boxes). -- Recorded Sound Research Center, Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Papers, including discographic and photographic materials, included in the John Secrist Jr. Collection of nearly 1,700 operatic sound recordings.

  2. Geraldine Farrar papers, 1895-1960s

    approximately 25,000 items. 67 boxes. 28.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Geraldine Farrar was an American opera singer and film actress. The collection consists of Farrar's personal papers relating to her life and career, including correspondence, scrapbooks and clippings, photographs and music materials containing sketches, autograph manuscripts, and printed music composed or edited by Farrar. In addition, the collection contains biographical materials, Farrar's writings, contracts, radio scripts, concert programs, awards, and other miscellaneous items.

  3. National Negro Opera Company collection, 1879-1997

    11,250 items. 68 containers. 39 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The National Negro Opera Company, the first African-American opera company in the United States, was founded in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1941, by Mary Cardwell Dawson. The collection contains materials and records related to the company and to Dawson. It includes correspondence, administrative and financial records, photographs, programs, promotional and publicity materials, scrapbooks, clippings, address books, notebooks, music, and books. In addition, the collection contains materials related to opera singer La Julia Rhea, who performed with the company, and Walter M. Dawson, Mary Cardwell Dawson's husband, who worked for the company.

  4. Harold Prince papers, 1935-2010

    2,000 items. 22 containers. 9.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Harold Prince is a theater producer and director. The papers chiefly consist of personal correspondence and Prince’s annotated copies of the scripts for the shows he directed.

  5. Belle Brown collection, 1865-1912

    180 items. 3 containers. 1.75 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Belle Brown was an American soprano who had a brief operatic career abroad around the turn of the twentieth century. Although little biographical information exists about her, the contents of this collection document her relationships with prominent and respected European performers of the day. She studied with many celebrated performers and pedagogues, including Désirée Artôt, Pauline Lucca, and Jean and Edouard de Reszke. The collection contains correspondence with performers and pedagogues; photographs and prints of composers, performers, musicians, and other influential figures in European musical society around the turn of the century; and miscellaneous clippings and ephemeral materials.

  6. Serge Lifar collection on Serge Diaghilev, 1750-1950

    around 1,350 items. 81 boxes. 91 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    This collection is comprised in large part of printed music, widely representing 18th century Italian and 19th century Russian operatic music. Includes rare pre-revolutionary editions of Russian folk songs, annotated performance scores of Stravinsky, Mussorgsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Gounod, Cimarosa. Non-musical materials include three letters from S. Prokofiev to S. Diaghilev, rare edition of books on music, literature and theater, libretti and synopses, souvenir books and programs and photographs. Several of the programs and photographs show Léon Bakst's set and costume designs. Non-musical materials also include Diaghilev’s personal notebook, containing entries in French, Russian, and English made in 1926-1929.

  7. Program notes from the Voice of America Music Library Collection, 1946-1988

    23 linear feet (55 boxes, approximately 19,250 items). -- Recorded Sound Research Center, Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    United States international broadcaster bureau founded in 1942. Programs and program notes make up the largest portion of the collection, along with press releases, promotional materials, audition notes, and scripts to document the programming of the VOA.

  8. Houston L. Maples family collection on Russian theatre, opera, and ballet, 1940-2004

    approximately 180 items. 4 containers. 2 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Houston L. Maples was a United States naval attaché to Moscow. His son, Houston Maples Jr., worked in the State Department's Moscow Office of Information and Culture. The collection includes photographs, programs, and writings pertaining to dance and opera, particularly in the immediate post-World War II period in the Soviet Union. The Bolshoi Theatre and Kirov Ballet (now known as Mariinsky Ballet) are well-represented.

  9. Helen Traubel papers, 1910-1972

    approximately 3,500 items. 37 containers. 18.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Helen Traubel (1899-1972) was an American soprano and writer. Known for her Wagnerian opera roles, Traubel spent 16 years at the Metropolitan Opera before exploring work in television, musical theater, and nightclubs. This collection documents her career through correspondence, photographs, scripts, scrapbooks, and her annotated music scores and orchestra library.

  10. Max Rudolf papers, 1922-1993

    approximately 4,500 items. 22 containers. 11.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Max Rudolf was a German-born American conductor and music educator. He is best known for his work with the Metropolitan Opera, the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, and the Curtis Institute of Music. The collection contains Rudolf's extensive correspondence with prominent 20th century musical figures, Metropolitan Opera annual files documenting his years with that organization, and a few photographs.