19 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Orchestral music--Scores.

  1. Andre Kostelanetz collection, 1922-1984

    approximately 150,000 items. 1290 containers. 400 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Andre Kostelanetz was a conductor, arranger, and pianist known for juxtaposing popular and classical repertoire in radio broadcasts and concert performances with some of the world's leading orchestras. He also commissioned several compositions which have since become staples in the orchestral repertoire, including works by Aaron Copland, William Schuman, and Jerome Kern. The collection consists of his musical arrangements, correspondence, business papers, programs, photographs, clippings, and scrapbooks, documenting his 50-plus-year career in the United States. It also includes materials related to the career of Kostelanetz's first wife, soprano Lily Pons.

  2. Henryk Szeryng collection, 1933-1988

    approximately 11,000 items. 169 containers. 75 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection documents the life and career of violinist Henryk Szeryng (1918-1988) who was also known as a teacher, patron of the arts and cultural ambassador. The collection contains printed and holograph manuscript scores, writings, teaching materials, correspondence, personal and business papers, performance files and programs, photographs, clippings, scrapbooks, publicity material, awards, and books.

  3. Ernst Bacon collection, 1898-1990

    approximately 6,000 items. 54 boxes. 16 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Ernst Bacon was an American composer, pianist, and conductor. Largely a self-taught composer, Bacon also became an esteemed administrator and educator, serving as director of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) Federal Music Project in 1935 and later as composer-in-residence at Syracuse University from 1947-1963. The collection contains music, writings, correspondence, iconography, programs, clippings, publicity materials, and other miscellaneous items.

  4. Alberto Nepomuceno collection, 1887-1988

    approximately 150 items. 6 boxes. 13 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Alberto Nepomuceno was a Brazilian composer, conductor, and teacher. The collection consists primarily of scores, most of which are photocopies of holographs, including two operas, nine orchestral, and twelve chamber and solo works, as well as approximately forty songs and other vocal works. In addition, the collection contains several photographs of the composer and his wife and other printed materials.

  5. Irving Fine collection, 1930-1993

    approximately 4,350 items. 21 boxes. 7 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Irving Fine was an American conductor, teacher, and composer whose works assimilated neoclassical, romantic, and serial elements. The bulk of the materials in the collection are musical scores and sketches which represent nearly his entire musical output. In addition, there are photographs, clippings, programs, and scrapbooks, as well as correspondence from twentieth-century musicians such as Leonard Bernstein, Aaron Copland, Lukas Foss, Alberto Ginastera, Ned Rorem, and William Schuman.

  6. Leonard B. Smith papers, 1859-2001

    approximately 202,110 items. 737 containers. 300 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Leonard B. Smith (1915-2002) was an American cornetist, concert band conductor, and band music publisher. Smith is primarily known as the leader of the Detroit Concert Band (1946- circa 1990), and the approximately 3,200 titles in the concert band library comprise the largest portion of the collection. Also included is a portion of the Ford Sunday Evening Hour Orchestra music library, method books, chamber music, cornet and trumpet solos, clippings, correspondence, photographs, programs, and writings.

  7. Robert Evett collection, 1942-2001

    approximately 1,450 items. 9 containers. 6.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Robert Evett (1922-1975) was a composer, arts editor, and critic who made his home primarily in the Washington, D.C., area. This collection contains several scores, sketches, and instrument parts for works composed by Evett; biographical information collected by Evett's family after his death; and his published book and music reviews for the "Atlantic Monthly," "New Republic," and "Washington Star-News."

  8. Henry Cowell music manuscripts, 1909-1965

    approximately 1,100 items. 37 containers plus bound scores. 18 linear feet . 10 microfilm reels. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Henry Cowell was an American composer, theorist, writer, pianist, and teacher. A member of the 1920s "ultra-modernists," Cowell's experimental compositions explored a myriad of unusual instrumental techniques and non-Western musical sounds. Works such as The Aeolian Harp (1923), The Banshee (1925), and Mosaic Quartet (1935) are seminal examples of his exploration of 'tone clusters,' or secondal harmonies, for expanding the musical sound palette. Cowell was also a prolific writer and editor who founded The New Music Quarterly in 1927 as an outlet for the musical works of modern composers. This finding aid collates classed holograph manuscript scores, sketches, and parts by Cowell that were donated to the Music Division beginning in the 1950s.

  9. Elliott Carter music manuscripts and other papers, 1933-1971

    approximately 18,900 items. 55 containers plus bound scores. 19 linear feet. 22 microfilm reels. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Among other accolades, American composer Elliott Carter was a two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Music for his second and third string quartets. A student of Nadia Boulanger, his works combined American and European styles of modernism, and his compositional style, based around collections of pitches, was later described as musical set theory. Carter was also known for his use of proportional tempo changes, which is referred to by scholars as metric modulation. Carter composed in a wide variety of genres, including symphonies, concertos, chamber music, ballets, and choral music. This finding aid collates classed holograph scores, sketches, and parts by Carter that were donated to the Music Division beginning in the 1960s. Additional music materials, programs, and a small amount of photographs and other papers will be added to this document in the future.

  10. Erich Wolfgang Korngold collection, 1889-2008

    approximately 9,000 items . 97 containers. 45 linear feet. 17 microfilm reels. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Erich Wolfgang Korngold was a composer and pianist noted for his orchestral works, operas, concertos, film scores, piano music, and chamber music. A musical prodigy, he famously displayed immense talent for both performance and composition. Korngold and his family were part of the exodus of European artists who moved to the United States during the rise of Nazism in Europe. He lived and worked in Hollywood, California, until his death in 1957. The Erich Wolfgang Korngold Collection consists primarily of holograph and copyist music manuscripts that span his entire compositional output, as well as sketches, fragments, libretti, and film cue sheets. Many works not in Korngold's hand include his annotations. The collection also contains non-music materials such as correspondence, financial papers, photographs, and programs.