23 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Orchestral music.

  1. Andre Kostelanetz collection, 1922-1984

    approximately 150,000 items. 1290 containers. 400 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Andre Kostelanetz was a conductor, arranger, and pianist known for juxtaposing popular and classical repertoire in radio broadcasts and concert performances with some of the world's leading orchestras. He also commissioned several compositions which have since become staples in the orchestral repertoire, including works by Aaron Copland, William Schuman, and Jerome Kern. The collection consists of his musical arrangements, correspondence, business papers, programs, photographs, clippings, and scrapbooks, documenting his 50-plus-year career in the United States. It also includes materials related to the career of Kostelanetz's first wife, soprano Lily Pons.

  2. Ferde Grofé collection, 1890-1960

    around 20,000 items. 262 containers. 105 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Ferde Grofé was an American composer, arranger, conductor and pianist. The collection primarily consists of music manuscript compositions and arrangements, including holograph and copyist scores and parts of Grofé's original compositions, holograph scores and parts for arrangements by Grofé and others that were performed by Grofé's band, and works for symphonic orchestra. In addition, the collection includes correspondence, clippings, photographs, programs, scrapbooks and scripts.

  3. Glenn Dillard Gunn papers, 1802-1961

    approximately 750 items. 14 boxes. 4.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Glenn Dillard Gunn was an American pianist, conductor, music critic, and teacher. The collection contains correspondence from notable musical figures such as Ferruccio Busoni, Teresa Careño, Percy Grainger, and Moriz Rosenthal, as well as writings by and about Gunn, photographs, annotated printed scores, scrapbooks, and other items that document Gunn's life and career.

  4. Henryk Szeryng collection, 1933-1988

    approximately 11,000 items. 169 containers. 75 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection documents the life and career of violinist Henryk Szeryng (1918-1988) who was also known as a teacher, patron of the arts and cultural ambassador. The collection contains printed and holograph manuscript scores, writings, teaching materials, correspondence, personal and business papers, performance files and programs, photographs, clippings, scrapbooks, publicity material, awards, and books.

  5. Ernst Bacon collection, 1898-1990

    approximately 6,000 items. 54 boxes. 16 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Ernst Bacon was an American composer, pianist, and conductor. Largely a self-taught composer, Bacon also became an esteemed administrator and educator, serving as director of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) Federal Music Project in 1935 and later as composer-in-residence at Syracuse University from 1947-1963. The collection contains music, writings, correspondence, iconography, programs, clippings, publicity materials, and other miscellaneous items.

  6. Alberto Nepomuceno collection, 1887-1988

    approximately 150 items. 6 boxes. 13 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Alberto Nepomuceno was a Brazilian composer, conductor, and teacher. The collection consists primarily of scores, most of which are photocopies of holographs, including two operas, nine orchestral, and twelve chamber and solo works, as well as approximately forty songs and other vocal works. In addition, the collection contains several photographs of the composer and his wife and other printed materials.

  7. Serge Koussevitzky archive, 1880-1978

    around 200,000 items. 505 containers. 224 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Serge Koussevitzky was a Russian-born conductor, composer, and double bassist. The archive includes correspondence, personal and business papers, photographs, writings, clippings, scrapbooks, programs, and other materials which serve as a record of Koussevitzky's life and career, and document some of the most significant aspects of twentieth-century music. Through his work as a conductor and publisher, and his efforts to commission new musical works, Koussevitzky maintained deep ties with many of the finest composers and musicians of the day. These figures are represented in their personal and professional affiliations with the conductor. The collection extensively chronicles periods in the history of organizations such as the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Berkshire Music Center, the Koussevitzky Music Foundation, and the American International Music Fund. Material in the collection dates from Koussevitzky's years in his native Russia and also contains material created after Koussevitzky's death, reflecting his widow Olga's continuing work with various organizations and projects. Musical compositions commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky are part of the Serge Koussevitzky Music Foundation Collection, and are shelved in ML30.3c, ML30.3c2, ML30.3c3, and ML30.3e2.

  8. Irving Fine collection, 1930-1993

    approximately 4,350 items. 21 boxes. 7 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Irving Fine was an American conductor, teacher, and composer whose works assimilated neoclassical, romantic, and serial elements. The bulk of the materials in the collection are musical scores and sketches which represent nearly his entire musical output. In addition, there are photographs, clippings, programs, and scrapbooks, as well as correspondence from twentieth-century musicians such as Leonard Bernstein, Aaron Copland, Lukas Foss, Alberto Ginastera, Ned Rorem, and William Schuman.

  9. Leonard Bernstein collection, circa 1900-1995

    around 400,000 items. 1,723 boxes. 710 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Leonard Bernstein was an American composer, conductor, writer, lecturer, and pianist. The collection contains correspondence, photographs, writings, personal business papers, the archives from his corporate identity, Amberson Inc., scrapbooks, clippings and press materials, programs, datebooks and schedules, iconography, address books, and fan mail. In addition, it contains music manuscripts for many of his compositions, including The Age of Anxiety (Symphony no. 2); Candide; Chichester Psalms; Fancy Free; Jeremiah (Symphony no. 1); On the Waterfront; Prelude, Fugue and Riffs; Serenade after Plato's "Symposium"; Trouble in Tahiti; West Side Story; and Wonderful Town.

  10. Leonard B. Smith papers, 1859-2001

    approximately 202,110 items. 737 containers. 300 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Leonard B. Smith (1915-2002) was an American cornetist, concert band conductor, and band music publisher. Smith is primarily known as the leader of the Detroit Concert Band (1946- circa 1990), and the approximately 3,200 titles in the concert band library comprise the largest portion of the collection. Also included is a portion of the Ford Sunday Evening Hour Orchestra music library, method books, chamber music, cornet and trumpet solos, clippings, correspondence, photographs, programs, and writings.