3 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Pickett, John T. (John Thomas), 1822-1884.

  1. T.O. Selfridge papers, 1852-1926

    1,900 items. 8 containers. 2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Naval officer and explorer. Correspondence, journals, logbooks, notebooks, scrapbooks, and miscellaneous papers relating primarily to the American naval expedition to the Isthmus of Darien (Panama) headed by Selfridge. Includes other aspects of his naval career.

  2. Confederate States of America records, 1854-1889

    18,500 items. 124 containers plus 5 oversize. 28 linear feet. 71 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Correspondence, proclamations, messages of the president, court cases, minute books, docket books, customs records, financial records, letterbooks, orders, reports, and other records of the Confederate Department of Justice, Department of State, Department of the Treasury, Post Office Department, Navy Department, and War Department. Includes Confederate constitutional documents and the James Wolcott Wadsworth collection of diplomatic correspondence and letters of Raphael Semmes.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  3. Causten-Pickett papers, 1765-1916

    33,000 items. 113 containers. 45 linear feet. 2 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    James H. Causten, businessman of Baltimore, Maryland, and Washington, D.C., who worked to settle French spoliation claims; John T. Pickett, United States and Confederate diplomat and army officer, and lawyer of Washington, D.C.; and Pickett's son, Theodore John Pickett, lawyer of Washington, D.C., who succeeded to Causten's interest in the claims cases. Correspondence, insurance policies, powers of attorney, promissory notes, bills of exchange, American and French court records, ship case files, other financial and legal papers, printed matter, and other papers relating chiefly to French spoliation claims.