6 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Prohibition--United States.

  1. Henry D. Flood papers, 1870-1921

    32,500 items ; 88 containers ; 36.2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Lawyer, state legislator, and U.S. representative from Virginia. Correspondence, legislative bills, resolutions, newspaper articles, and other papers relating chiefly to political affairs in Virginia and Flood’s legislative career.

  2. Women's Organization for National Prohibition Reform records, 1896-1933.

    350 items ; 1 container ; .4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Chiefly responses to queries about international liquor policies and regulations collected from consuls general and other foreign representatives between 1931 and 1933 by Mrs. Edward Wales Root, research director of the Women's Organization for National Prohibition Reform, which advocated repeal of the Eighteenth Amendment.

  3. Alexander Jeffrey McKelway papers, 1814-1942

    5,600 items ; 9 containers ; 3.4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Clergyman, reformer, and Southern secretary of the National Child Labor Committee. Correspondence, telegrams, speeches, articles, notes and drafts of a biography of St. Clair McKelway, longtime editor of the Brooklyn Eagle and uncle of Alexander, family papers, financial material, printed matter, a scrapbook, and other papers relating mainly to child labor legislation and to the McKelway family.

  4. Richmond Pearson Hobson papers, 1889-1966

    27,300 items. 78 containers plus 1 oversize. 31.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Naval officer and United States representative from Alabama. Correspondence, memoranda, speeches, lectures, articles, reports, notes, analyses, naval orders, press clippings, photographs, and other papers relating chiefly to Hobson's naval career and to his efforts on behalf of prohibition, restrictions on international drug trafficking, and opposition to the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration.

  5. Charles Evans Hughes papers, 1836-1950

    61,000 items ; 233 containers plus 2 oversize ; 86 linear feet ; 150 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Governor of New York, secretary of state, and chief justice of the United States. Family papers, correspondence, speeches and biographical writings, subject files, notes, scrapbooks, clippings, and other printed and miscellaneous matter relating principally to Hughes's political and judicial career and his service on various international bodies and commissions.

  6. Blackwell family papers, 1759-1960

    29,000 items ; 96 containers ; 40 linear feet ; 76 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Family members include author and suffragist Alice Stone Blackwell (1857-1950); her parents, Henry Browne Blackwell (1825-1909) and Lucy Stone (1818-1893), abolitionists and advocates of women's rights; her aunt, Elizabeth Blackwell (1821-1910), the first woman to receive an academic medical degree; and Elizabeth Blackwell's adopted daughter, Kitty Barry Blackwell (1848-1936). Includes...