6 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Prokofiev, Sergey, 1891-1953.

  1. Serge Lifar collection on Serge Diaghilev, 1750-1950

    around 1,350 items. 81 boxes. 91 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    This collection is comprised in large part of printed music, widely representing 18th century Italian and 19th century Russian operatic music. Includes rare pre-revolutionary editions of Russian folk songs, annotated performance scores of Stravinsky, Mussorgsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Gounod, Cimarosa. Non-musical materials include three letters from S. Prokofiev to S. Diaghilev, rare edition of books on music, literature and theater, libretti and synopses, souvenir books and programs and photographs. Several of the programs and photographs show Léon Bakst's set and costume designs. Non-musical materials also include Diaghilev’s personal notebook, containing entries in French, Russian, and English made in 1926-1929.

  2. Serge Koussevitzky archive, 1880-1978

    around 200,000 items. 505 containers. 224 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Serge Koussevitzky was a Russian-born conductor, composer, and double bassist. The archive includes correspondence, personal and business papers, photographs, writings, clippings, scrapbooks, programs, and other materials which serve as a record of Koussevitzky's life and career, and document some of the most significant aspects of twentieth-century music. Through his work as a conductor and publisher, and his efforts to commission new musical works, Koussevitzky maintained deep ties with many of the finest composers and musicians of the day. These figures are represented in their personal and professional affiliations with the conductor. The collection extensively chronicles periods in the history of organizations such as the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Berkshire Music Center, the Koussevitzky Music Foundation, and the American International Music Fund. Material in the collection dates from Koussevitzky's years in his native Russia and also contains material created after Koussevitzky's death, reflecting his widow Olga's continuing work with various organizations and projects. Musical compositions commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky are part of the Serge Koussevitzky Music Foundation Collection, and are shelved in ML30.3c, ML30.3c2, ML30.3c3, and ML30.3e2.

  3. Jascha Heifetz papers, 1786-1991

    approximately 17, 500 items. 280 boxes. 52 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Russian-American musician Jascha Heifetz was a virtuosic violinist who became a dedicated teacher. The collection includes his personal music library of original compositions, arrangements, and transcriptions. Concert programs document his performances from 1911 to 1974, and photographs, photo albums, and scrapbooks span the violinist's entire life. The correspondence contains letters from significant twentieth-century musical figures such as Leopold Auer, Benjamin Britten, Sergei Prokofiev, George Bernard Shaw, and Sir William Walton.

  4. Vernon Duke collection, 1918-1968

    around 17,500 items. 146 boxes. 52 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Vernon Duke (born Vladimir Dukelsky) was an American composer and songwriter. He rose to success in the 1930s with hit songs such as "April in Paris" and "Autumn in New York" and later collaborated with many leading composers and lyricists of the period, including George and Ira Gershwin, Serge Prokofiev, and Serge Koussevitzky. The collection contains manuscript and printed music, correspondence, subject files, photographs, and other materials related to his career.

  5. Edward Beach collection of jazz photographs and other iconography, 1940-1975

    approximately 150 items. 9 boxes. 5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Edward Beach Collection of Jazz Photographs and Other Iconography consist exclusively of photographs and other iconography, primarily of jazz musicians, but a few notable figures from other musical and artistic disciplines are also represented. Images of particular interest include figures such as Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington, John Birks "Dizzy" Gillespie, Billie Holiday, Charles Mingus, Bessie Smith, Aaron Copland, Serge Prokofiev, Ralph Vaughan Williams, and Vaslav Nijinsky.

  6. Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation collection, 1894-1953

    56,680 items. 109 containers. 48.50 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge was a composer, pianist, and patron of music. In 1925, she created the Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation at the Library of Congress in support of chamber music. The collection contains Coolidge's correspondence to and from many of the prominent musical artists of the first half of the twentieth century. Extensive correspondence between Coolidge and Library of Congress librarians and administrators is also included. The remaining materials in the collection, including photographs, scrapbooks, business papers, programs, publicity materials, iconography, realia, and clippings, are available for research and will be incorporated into the finding aid at a later date. Music manuscripts of works commissioned by Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge or the Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation in the Library of Congress comprise a substantial portion of the collection and are cataloged individually.