10 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Putnam, Herbert, 1861-1955.

  1. Herbert Putnam papers, 1783-1958

    8,000 items. 35 containers plus 1 oversize. 14 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Librarian of Congress. Family and general correspondence, family diaries and journals, speeches, articles, scrapbooks, legal papers, genealogical material, autograph collection, and printed matter relating largely to Putnam's family and personal life, including diaries and letters of many members of the Putnam and allied O'Hara, Pinhey, and Mason families. Also includes papers relating to Putnam's interests and activities in the field of librarianship, especially to his work as director of the Boston Public Library and his position as Librarian of Congress.

  2. John A. Lomax and Alan Lomax papers, 1907-1969

    approximately 4900 items; 14 boxes; 5.6 linear feet.. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collection of correspondence, research notes, transcripts, sheet music, manuscript music transcriptions, song texts, song books, maps, and administrative documents dating primarily from the tenure of John A. Lomax and his son Alan Lomax at the Archive of American Folk Song, Library of Congress, from 1932-1942, but with a few items dating to the 1960s. Correspondents include various staff at the Library of Congress, in particular, Harold Spivacke; and folklorists, musicians, writers, academics, film directors, and others, including Huddie "Lead Belly" Ledbetter and Woody Guthrie; various government agencies including the Works Progress Administration, Federal Writers' Project, and War Department; broadcasting and record companies; publishers; and fans of Alan Lomax's radio shows, who sent in contributions of folk songs and folklore from their childhood and communities. Documents include drafts of speeches, lectures, articles, and drafts of their books for publication.

  3. Hendrik Christian Andersen papers, 1844-1940

    12,000 items. 45 containers plus 2 oversize. 18 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Author and sculptor. Correspondence, diaries, notebooks, poetry, lectures, family papers, drawings, and photographs relating primarily to Andersen's interest in the arts and in the creation of a world capital. Also includes correspondence, diaries, notebooks, and writings of his sister-in-law, Olivia Cushing Andersen.

  4. Alexis Vasilevich Babine papers, 1895-1953

    250 items. 5 containers plus 1 oversize. 2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Librarian, teacher, and author. Correspondence, lectures, articles, journals, other writings, and miscellaneous material relating chiefly to Babine's experiences during the Russian Revolution, his work in creative writing, and a history in Russian of the United States.

  5. William Dawson Johnston papers, 1842-1927

    7,500 items. 15 containers. 5.8 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Librarian and historian. Correspondence, memoranda, reports, lists, notes, writings, photographs, and clippings and other printed matter. Chiefly relates to librarianship and the history of libraries.

  6. Burton Egbert Stevenson papers, 1900-1951

    7,700 items. 33 containers plus 1 oversize. 13.2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Anthologist, author, and librarian. Correspondence with poets and other writers, comments on the origin of quotations, obscure biographical data on literary figures, and negotiations with publishers relating to the compilation of Stevenson's anthologies. Includes correspondence and administrative files from his service as European representative of the American Library Association, including material on the American Library in Paris, founded in 1918. Also contains drafts and copies of his own writings.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  7. J. Franklin Jameson papers, 1604-1994

    61,000 items. 206 containers plus 2 oversize. 40.7 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Historian and librarian. Correspondence, diaries, writings, lecture notes, biographical material, family papers, reports, photographs, printed matter, and other papers relating primarily to Jameson's work as an historian, his role in the founding and early history of the American Historical Association and the American Historical Review, the movement for the establishment of the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, the Dictionary of American Biography, and his work as director of the Department of Historical Research of the Carnegie Institution of Washington.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  8. Philip Lee Phillips papers, 1885-1921

    200 items. 4 containers. 1.2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Cartographer and chief director of maps of Library of Congress Map Division. Correspondence, writings, printed matter, and other personal material relating to Phillips’s work and career at the Library of Congress as a cartographer and chief of the Library’s Map Division.

  9. North American Review correspondence, 1858-1912

    875 items. 3 containers. 1.2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    First literary periodical in the United States. Correspondence between contributors to the North American Review and its editors.

  10. Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation collection, 1894-1953

    56,680 items. 109 containers. 48.50 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge was a composer, pianist, and patron of music. In 1925, she created the Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation at the Library of Congress in support of chamber music. The collection contains Coolidge's correspondence to and from many of the prominent musical artists of the first half of the twentieth century. Extensive correspondence between Coolidge and Library of Congress librarians and administrators is also included. The remaining materials in the collection, including photographs, scrapbooks, business papers, programs, publicity materials, iconography, realia, and clippings, are available for research and will be incorporated into the finding aid at a later date. Music manuscripts of works commissioned by Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge or the Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation in the Library of Congress comprise a substantial portion of the collection and are cataloged individually.