58 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Radio programs.

  1. Yale Newman scripts collection, 1953-1963

    approximately 1,950 items. 5 containers. 2.1 linear feet. -- Recorded Sound Research Center, National Audio-Visual Conservation Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Yale Newman Scripts Collection consists of scripts and notes from Newman's radio and television broadcasts from 1953-1962, including his coverage of the trial of Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann.

    Please note:

    Access restrictions apply.

  2. Effie Burton radio script collection, 1938-1941

    1.7 linear feet (4 boxes). -- Recorded Sound Research Center, National Audio-Visual Conservation Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection consists of radio scripts from five different local broadcasting programs, airing in New York City or in California's San Joaquin Valley. Three of the programs were sponsored and hosted by Dr. Harry Morgan, dentist.

  3. Armed Forces Radio and Television Service Collection, 1943-1997

    approximately 55,300 items. 159 containers. 66.28 linear feet. -- Recorded Sound Research Center, National Audio-Visual Conservation Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    This collection is primarily comprised of scripts, newsletters, packing lists, and other programming information. Other materials relate to the operations of the AFRTS in America and abroad, and the organization’s efforts to document and preserve its history.

  4. Program notes from the Voice of America Music Library Collection, 1946-1988

    23 linear feet (55 boxes, approximately 19,250 items). -- Recorded Sound Research Center, National Audio-Visual Conservation Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    United States international broadcaster bureau founded in 1942. Programs and program notes make up the largest portion of the collection, along with press releases, promotional materials, audition notes, and scripts to document the programming of the VOA.

    Please note:

    Access restrictions apply.

  5. Records from the Transco collection, ca. 1931-1952

    approximately 13,370 items. 40 containers. 16.95 linear feet. -- Recorded Sound Research Center, National Audio-Visual Conservation Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Transco Collection consists of paper records from the Radio Transcription Company, Transco, which includes correspondence, business records, advertising and marketing materials, scripts, cue sheets, and other production documents.

    Please note:

    Access restrictions apply.

  6. Arch Oboler collection, 1916-1992

    161.6 linear feet (364 boxes, 1 negative folder, 11 map case folders, approximately 127,075 items). 107 sound tape reels : . 124 sound cassettes : . 4 sound discs : . 1 microphone. -- Recorded Sound Research Center, National Audio-Visual Conservation Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Nearly the entirety of the prolific output of radio playwright and independent film maker Arch Oboler (1909-1987) in radio, motion pictures, television, theater, and print is contained in the Arch Oboler Collection. Featured are his radio plays from the 1930s and 1940s and the first three-dimensional feature film, Bwana Devil.

    Please note:

    Access restrictions apply.

  7. Raymond Swing papers, 1933-1964

    6,500 items. 40 containers. 16 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Journalist and radio commentator. Primarily scripts of Swing's radio broadcasts including those presented on the Voice of America. Also includes correspondence, lectures, and writings by Swing.

  8. Dan Golenpaul papers, 1934-1981

    300 items. 2 containers. .8 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Radio and television producer. Correspondence, essays, scripts, contracts, news clippings, and guest lists pertaining to the "Information Please" program produced by Golenpaul for radio and television and to his subsequent publication, Information Please Almanac.

  9. Howard Teichmann papers, 1857-2001

    49,500 items. 141 containers plus 13 oversize. 60 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Author, educator, and theater administrator. Correspondence, drafts and typescripts of writings, financial records, notes, photographs, and research material pertaining to Teichmann's career as a playwright, biographer, educator, and theater administrator.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  10. Lawrence E. Spivak papers, 1917-1994

    104,000 items. 404 containers plus 20 oversize. 162.8 linear feet. 24 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Editor, publisher, and television producer. Correspondence, radio and television transcripts, card files, articles, newspaper clippings, scrapbooks, printed ephemera, financial records, memoranda, and other papers relating primarily to Spivak's career in publishing, radio, and television.

    Please note:

    Access restrictions apply.