4 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Railroads--Mexico.

  1. Edward Lee Plumb papers, 1825-1903

    3,600 items ; 20 containers ; 5.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Diplomat and secretary of the United States legation in Mexico. Correspondence, journals, clippings, and other papers relating primarily to Plumb’s negotiations relating to the Mexican railway system.

  2. San José de Queréndaro Hacienda records, 1543-1922

    2 items ; 2 containers ; 0.8 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Bound volumes of files kept by the Jesuits, original owners of the hacienda. Subjects include the acquisition and sale of land, ownership disputes, water rights, rental of property, agricultural production, livestock and livestock brands, and relations with the Indians of Mexico. Also includes correspondence and fiscal accounts with the local railroad company

  3. Alfred Mordecai papers, 1790-1948

    3,850 items ; 17 containers ; 4.4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    United States Army officer, engineer, and ordnance expert. Correspondence, travel and other diaries and journals, and miscellaneous papers of Mordecai and his family.

  4. Herman Hollerith papers, 1850-1982

    11,700 items ; 34 containers plus 1 oversize ; 13.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Inventor and businessman. Correspondence, diary, financial and business papers, patents by Hollerith and others, blueprints, drawings, a Hollerith machine punch plate, writings about Hollerith by Geoffrey Austrian and others, biographical material, and other papers relating to Hollerith tabulating machines and their use in census taking (1890-1910), operation of Tabulating Machine Company and its merger with two other companies forming Computer-Tabulating-Recording Company (1911), and Hollerith's association with this company and its successor, International Business Machines Corporation.