3 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Regional planning.

  1. Harold Foote Gosnell papers, 1931-1962

    9,200 items ; 23 containers ; 9.2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Political scientist, educator, and government consultant. Chiefly subject files consisting of correspondence, memoranda, reports, research data, maps, charts, printed and near-print material, and miscellany. The papers relate principally to projects Gosnell conducted for various government agencies, including a study on state and regional planning for the National Resources Committee; studies on government information services, especially those of the Office of War Information and the Department of State; and analyses of foreign elections for the Central Intelligence Agency, primarily in the Philippines, Indonesia, and the Sudan.

  2. Rhoda Métraux papers, 1837-1997

    90,000 items ; 224 containers plus 1 classified and 20 oversize ; 101 linear feet ; 802 digital files (2.2 MB) . -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Anthropologist and author. Correspondence, lectures and writings, field diaries, field notes and notebooks, reports, proposals, minutes, programs, interview transcripts, questionnaires, statistical analyses, artwork and drawings, photographs, maps, census data, projective testing materials, financial records, and printed matter pertaining to Métraux's career as an anthropologist and her professional and personal relationship with anthropologist Margaret Mead.

  3. Frederick Law Olmsted papers, 1777-1952

    24,000 items ; 73 containers plus 1 oversize ; 23 linear feet ; 60 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Landscape architect. Correspondence, letterbooks, journals, drafts of articles and books, speeches and lectures, biographical and genealogical data, business papers, scrapbooks, maps, drawings, and other papers encompassing Olmsted's career and private life. The papers focus on Olmsted's career as a landscape architect, specifically as a designer of parks and the grounds of private estates and public buildings and as a city and regional planner.