3 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Sacred vocal music.

  1. Hodges family collection, circa 1790-circa 1909

    around 430 items ; 64 boxes ; 16 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection contains manuscript and printed music, writings, and other materials compiled and collected by Edward Hodges and subsequently by his son, John Sebastian Bach Hodges. Noteworthy among Edward Hodges' writings are the Annuary, an attempt in later life to depict his earlier life, and documents relating to the design and construction of the 1846 Erben organ at Trinity Church in New York. Music scores and sketches of the collection may well be the largest extant source of Hodges' manuscript music, including both original music and transcriptions and arrangements of the works of others, mostly intended for performance during religious services. In addition, the collection includes manuscript and printed scores for the works of two of Edward Hodges' children, Faustina Hasse Hodges and John Sebastian Bach Hodges. Sacred music in the collection not composed by Hodges family members provides insight into the kind of music that was typically performed in Episcopal churches in this country during the 19th and early 20th centuries: chants, psalm and hymn tunes, litanies, introits, offertories, oratorios, etc. Especially interesting are the Breitkopf & Härtel publications of Haydn's Die Worte des Erlösers am Kreuze from 1801 and an early publication of Beethoven's Christus am Oldberge. Among the scores of secular music, John Stafford Smith's Musica Antiqua (London, 1812), an anthology of music from the 13th through the 18th centuries, is particularly noteworthy, as is Chant lyrique pour l'inauguration de la statue votée à sa Majesté l'empereur et roi by Etienne Méhul. The collection also includes sixteen volumes of late 18th and 19th century sheet music that were presumably compiled by one or more members of the Hodges family.

  2. Newland / Zeuner collection, circa 1735-circa 1900

    around 2,000 items ; 58 boxes ; 20 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Primarily music (printed and manuscript) for piano, 2 or 4 hands, and songs, with a concentration in sacred vocal works in Latin and English. (The music in Latin may represent the only known source of pre-Cäcilienverein 19th-century American Catholic Church music.) Composers range from Mozart and Rossini to George F. Root and Oliver Shaw. The collection contains the largest extant source of music by Charles Zeuner which was purchased by Newland after Zeuner's death.

  3. 1994 Neptune Plaza Concert Series collection, 1994

    9 folders in 2 boxes (1 linear foot).. 4 sound tape reels : analog: 7 1⁄2 ips, 2 track, stereo; 10 inch.. 3 sound cassettes (DAT): digital.. 251 photographs : negatives, contact sheets, black and white.. 124 slides : color.. 9 photographic prints : black and white, color; various sizes.. 5 videocassettes (Hi-8): sound, color.. 3 videocassettes (VHS): sound, color; 1/2 in.. -- Archive of Folk Culture, American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Manuscript materials, sound recordings, photographs, and moving images documenting the performance of Tibetan sacred music and dance; Tamburitza music from the Balkan Peninsula; Iroquois music; African American rhythm and blues quartet singing; gospel brass band music; bluegrass music; and Cuban mambo music recorded live outdoors on Neptune Plaza in front of the Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, at concerts from April through September 1994, sponsored by the American Folklife Center.