11 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Sound recording industry.

  1. Wanda Landowska and Denise Restout papers, 1843-2002

    approximately 41,000 items ; 255 containers ; 117.0 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Wanda Landowska was a Polish keyboardist, composer, and teacher best known for revitalizing harpsichord performance in the twentieth century. Her school at Saint-Leu-la-Forêt, founded in 1925, became one of the great centers for the collection, study, and performance of Baroque music until it was looted by the Nazis in 1940. The collection consists of annotated music, correspondence, business papers, writings, programs, photographs, and other materials that document the legacy of Landowska. These materials largely reflect the activities of Landowska and her pupil, Denise Restout, during their years at Saint-Leu and after their immigration to the United States in 1941.

  2. Joe Smith collection, 1986-1988

    263 sound cassettes. 3.6 linear feet (9 boxes, approximately 3,150 items). -- Recorded Sound Reference Center, Motion Picture, Broadcasting & Recorded Sound Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Oral history interviews conducted by recording industry executive Joe Smith with more than two hundred recording artists and executives from 1986 through 1988. Printed transcripts accompany most of the recorded interviews.

  3. Record industry publicity collection, 1937-1979

    21.75 linear feet (41 boxes and 8 oversize folders, approximately 17,900 items). -- Recorded Sound Reference Center, Motion Picture, Broadcasting & Recorded Sound Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Press releases, record catalogs, radio program scripts, promotional posters, monthly publications about new record releases, and other materials advertising sound recordings.

  4. H. Vose Greenough Jr. papers, 1937-1972

    .5 linear feet (2 boxes). -- Recorded Sound Reference Center, Motion Picture, Broadcasting & Recorded Sound Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Personal papers of H. Vose Greenough Jr., founder and owner of Technichord Records, a small recording company in Brookline, Massachusetts, as well as materials from Technichord Records.

  5. Jim Walsh papers, 1867-1987, and undated

    23.58 linear feet (17 boxes, 1 map case folder, approximately 12,860 items). -- Recorded Sound Reference Center, Motion Picture, Broadcasting & Recorded Sound Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The papers consist of correspondence, research files, photographs, scrapbooks, and other materials that form part of a larger collection of sound recordings and audio equipment assembled by journalist, radio host, and early recording collector Jim Walsh.

  6. Laurindo Almeida papers, 1912-1995

    approximately 6,500 items ; 84 containers ; 35 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Laurindo Almeida was a Brazilian-American guitarist and composer. Often credited for contributions to the development of jazz samba, Almeida was a prolific composer and arranger of music for both classical Spanish guitar and popular guitar. He was an acclaimed recording artist and became the first person to win Grammy Awards for both classical and jazz performances. The collection contains manuscript and printed music, correspondence, publicity materials, sound and video recordings, photographs, and other items related to his distinguished career.

  7. Andre Kostelanetz collection, 1922-1984

    approximately 150,000 items. 1287 containers. 400 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Andre Kostelanetz was a conductor, arranger, and pianist known for juxtaposing popular and classical repertoire in radio broadcasts and concert performances with some of the world's leading orchestras. He also commissioned several compositions which have since become staples in the orchestral repertoire, including works by Aaron Copland, William Schuman, and Jerome Kern. The collection consists of his musical arrangements, correspondence, business papers, programs, photographs, clippings, and scrapbooks, documenting his 50-plus-year career in the United States. It also includes materials related to the career of Kostelanetz's first wife, soprano Lily Pons.

  8. Bruce Lundvall papers, 1946-2012

    approximately 1,600 items ; 8 containers ; 4.0 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Bruce Lundvall was an American record company executive best known for his tenure as president and CEO of Blue Note Records. Lundvall was responsible for the revitalization of the label between 1984 and 2010, and signed many of the brightest stars in jazz and popular music, including Miles Davis, Stan Getz, Norah Jones, Wynton Marsalis, Willie Nelson, Cassandra Wilson, and countless others. The collection includes artist files, correspondence, photographs, promotional materials, and other items related to his career in the record industry.

  9. Serge Koussevitzky archive, 1880-1978

    around 200,000 items ; 505 containers ; 224 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Serge Koussevitzky was a Russian-born conductor, composer, and double bassist. The archive includes correspondence, personal and business papers, photographs, writings, clippings, scrapbooks, programs, and other materials which serve as a record of Koussevitzky's life and career, and document some of the most significant aspects of twentieth-century music. Through his work as a conductor and publisher, and his efforts to commission new musical works, Koussevitzky maintained deep ties with many of the finest composers and musicians of the day. These figures are represented in their personal and professional affiliations with the conductor. The collection extensively chronicles periods in the history of organizations such as the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Berkshire Music Center, the Koussevitzky Music Foundation, and the American International Music Fund. Material in the collection dates from Koussevitzky's years in his native Russia and also contains material created after Koussevitzky's death, reflecting his widow Olga's continuing work with various organizations and projects. Musical compositions commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky are part of the Serge Koussevitzky Music Foundation Collection, and are shelved in ML30.3c, ML30.3c2, ML30.3c3, and ML30.3e2.

  10. Jack Kapp collection, circa 1900-1949

    69 items, including 63 drawings and 6 prints. -- Recorded Sound Reference Center, Motion Picture, Broadcasting & Recorded Sound Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collection of mostly original cartoon drawings, one framed album cover, and some correspondence assembled by American Decca Records founder and president Jack Kapp. The drawings provide historical commentary on the issues of the phonograph industry, particularly the American Federation of Musicians recording ban of 1942-1944, and the place of the phonograph in American life.