8 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Stone, Lucy, 1818-1893.

  1. Susan B. Anthony papers, 1846-1934

    500 items. 7 containers. 3 linear feet. 7 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Reformer and suffragist. Correspondence, diaries, daybook, speeches, scrapbooks, and miscellaneous papers relating primarily to Anthony's writings, lectures, and other efforts on behalf of women's suffrage and women's rights. Includes material pertaining to the National Woman Suffrage Association, after 1890 the National American Woman Suffrage Association, and to the New York State Woman Suffrage Association.

  2. Visual materials from the Blackwell family papers

    171 items (chiefly lantern slides and photographic prints) ; 28 x 23 cm. or smaller. -- Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Blackwell family members worked from women's rights. This collection includes images of events and portraits of notable women and men involved in the women's suffrage movement.

  3. Blackwell family papers, 1759-1960

    29,000 items. 96 containers. 40 linear feet. 76 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Family members include author and suffragist Alice Stone Blackwell (1857-1950); her parents, Henry Browne Blackwell (1825-1909) and Lucy Stone (1818-1893), abolitionists and advocates of women's rights; her aunt, Elizabeth Blackwell (1821-1910), the first woman to receive an academic medical degree; and Elizabeth Blackwell's adopted daughter, Kitty Barry Blackwell (1848-1936). Includes correspondence, diaries, articles, and speeches of these and other Blackwell family members.

  4. William Dudley Foulke papers, circa 1470-1952

    2,500 items. 12 containers plus 1 oversize. 5.2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Lawyer, public official, and author from Indiana. Correspondence, diaries, journals, copybook, speeches, writings, notes, legal papers, clippings, printed material, and other papers, including a late fifteenth century fragment of the Tristram Saga obtained by Arthur Middleton Reeves on a trip to Iceland. The bulk of the collection consists of Foulke's correspondence reflecting his literary career and public service, including letters from Theodore Roosevelt discussing civil service reform, the Progressive movement, Woodrow Wilson, the World Court (Permanent Court of International Justice), and pacifism.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  5. Frederick Douglass papers, 1841-1967

    7,400 items. 53 containers plus 1 oversize. 19.5 linear feet. 34 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Abolitionist, diplomat, journalist, and orator. Correspondence, diary, speeches and writings, financial and legal records, and a subject file pertaining to the career of Frederick Douglass.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  6. Joshua R. Giddings and George Washington Julian papers, 1839-1899

    900 items. 7 containers. 1.8 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    United States representative from Ohio, abolitionist, and consul general to Canada (Joshua R. Giddings); United States representative from Indiana and biographer (George Washington Julian). Chiefly family letters of Giddings and Julian, together with some political correspondence. Topics include Ohio and Indiana politics and the abolition of slavery.

  7. Mary Ann Bickerdyke papers, 1847-1905

    1,800 items. 5 containers. 2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Nurse, agent for the United States Sanitary Commission, and pension attorney. Correspondence, lists, draft memoirs, printed matter, and other papers relating to Bickerdyke's family, her work as a Civil War nurse and agent for the United States Sanitary Commission, and her activities on behalf of Civil War veterans in the years following the war.

  8. Elizabeth Cady Stanton papers, 1814-1946

    1,000 items. 10 containers plus 1 oversize. 4.3 linear feet; 5 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Reformer and feminist. Correspondence, speeches, articles, drafts of books, scrapbooks, and printed matter documenting Elizabeth Cady Stanton's career as an advocate for women's rights. Includes material on her efforts on behalf of women's legal status and women's suffrage, the abolition of slavery, rights for African Americans following the Civil War, temperance, and other nineteenth-century social reform movements.