4 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Television broadcasting of news.

  1. Theodore Granik papers, 1930-1970

    175,000 items ; 473 containers plus 20 oversize ; 206 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Lawyer and radio and television moderator. Correspondence, legal proceedings, printed transcripts of radio and television broadcasts, scripts, memoranda, production inventories, and newspaper clippings documenting Granik's law practice in Washington, D. C., and New York, N.Y., and his work in broadcasting.

  2. Irving R. Levine papers, 1930-2009

    100,750 items ; 288 containers ; 115 linear feet ; 657 digital files (4.86 MB). -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Journalist and news commentator. Correspondence, memoranda, notebooks and notes, transcripts of interviews, radio and television scripts, news commentaries, articles, speeches, book drafts, background and research material, and other papers documenting Levine's career as a broadcast journalist and news commentator.

  3. Nancy Dickerson papers, 1933-2006

    12,000 items ; 34 containers ; 13.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Broadcast journalist and Washington hostess. Correspondence, family papers, scrapbooks, speech material, television scripts, writings, and other material relating to Dickerson's work as a pioneering woman in television journalism and her social activities.

  4. Stephen Hess papers, 1961-2016

    35,350 items ; 101 containers ; 40.4 linear feet ; 426 digital files (118.96GB). -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Political scientist and author. Interviews, surveys, research material, digital video files, correspondence, memoranda, and other material relating to Hess's professional life, including his work as a Brookings Institution fellow and George Washington University faculty member, as well as his tenure as Richard M. Nixon's Deputy Assistant to the President for Urban Affairs.