4 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) United States--Commerce--France.

  1. Lee-Palfrey families papers, 1780-1932

    1,500 items ; 4 containers ; 1.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Correspondence, diaries, journals, clippings, maps, photographs, and other papers of William Lee (1772-1840) of Boston, Massachusetts, Washington, D.C., and France and members of his family. Of particular interest are Lee's diaries and letters detailing his experiences as a commercial agent and secretary to the United States Legation in France. Also includes a journal and photographs of a...

  2. John Holker papers, 1777-1822

    4,500 items ; 41 containers ; 9.4 linear feet ; 20 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Merchant and French consul general in the United States. Correspondence, invoice book of Jacques-Donatien Leray de Chaumont, depositions taken before Benjamin Franklin, and navigational exercise booklets of George W. Stillman, relating to French military and economic assistance to the United States and American commerce during and after the Revolutionary War.

  3. Sylvanus Bourne papers, 1775-1859

    4100 items ; 39 containers ; 6.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Massachusetts businessman and United States consul in Santo Domingo (1790-1791) and in Amsterdam, the Netherlands (1794-1817). Drafts and photocopies of Bourne’s personal and diplomatic correspondence, business and commercial papers, a scrapbook, and account books. Consists primarily of correspondence relating to commerce between the United States and European countries, primarily France and...

  4. Custis-Lee family papers, 1700-circa 1928

    740 items ; 4 containers plus 1 oversize ; 1.8 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Correspondence, letterbooks, genealogical papers, notebooks, financial records, indentures, clippings, photographs, and other papers documenting the activities of several generations of the Custis and Lee families of Virginia, who served as diplomats, statesmen, politicians, planters, and military officers during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.