7 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Wallace, George C. (George Corley), 1919-1998.

  1. Elections Research Center records, 1918-1992

    110,000 items. 312 containers plus 1 oversize. 126 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Nonprofit elections research and analysis organization. Newspaper clippings, ballots, election returns, reports, notes, statistical data, correspondence, and printed material documents elections in all fifty states and the District of Columbia collected by the organization between 1955 and 1992 for the purpose of compilation, analysis, and publication.

  2. Curtis E. LeMay papers, 1918-1969

    131,550 items. 243 containers plus 14 classified and 4 oversize. 90 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Aviator and U.S. Army and Air Force officer. Correspondence, diaries, speeches, teletype messages, flight orders, mission reports, strategic plans and operation reports, appointment calendars, maps, photographs, commissions, scrapbooks, and other papers chiefly concerning LeMay's career as an aviator and officer in the U.S. Army and Air Force and as a vice-presidential candidate in 1968.

  3. Lawrence E. Spivak papers, 1917-1994

    104,000 items. 404 containers plus 20 oversize. 162.8 linear feet. 24 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Editor, publisher, and television producer. Correspondence, radio and television transcripts, card files, articles, newspaper clippings, scrapbooks, printed ephemera, financial records, memoranda, and other papers relating primarily to Spivak's career in publishing, radio, and television.

  4. George Lardner papers, 1923-2005

    180,000 items. 561 containers plus 1 oversize and 1 classified. 225 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Journalist and author. Writings, notes, interviews, correspondence, and research material including newspaper clippings, printed matter, reports, photographs, legal documents, financial records, and congressional hearing records and other government documents. Pertains chiefly to Lardner's career as a national news reporter for the Washington Post.

  5. Frank M. Johnson papers, 1865-1999

    255,000 items. 734 containers. 294 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Lawyer and judge. Correspondence, memoranda, agenda and minutes of meetings, reports, opinions, orders, briefs, writs, motions, petitions, depositions, transcripts, notes, clippings, and printed materials documenting Johnson's career as a federal judge and his involvement in professional activities.

  6. Russell E. Train papers, 1898-2005

    35,000 items. 115 containers plus 2 classified and 1 oversize. 42 linear feet. 44 digital files (91.9MB). -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Conservationist, jurist, and administrator. Diaries, correspondence, speeches and writings, governmental and organizational records, topical files, photographs, and miscellaneous papers relating to Train's work in public and private sectors on national and international environmental issues and policy.

  7. L. Patrick Gray III papers, 1931-2008

    36,000 items. 102 containers plus 2 classified and 3 oversize. 42 linear feet. 20,325 digital files (16.85 MB). -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Lawyer, assistant attorney general for the United States Department of Justice Civil Division, and acting director of the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Correspondence, memoranda, notes, writings, speeches, testimony, legal records, military records, photographs, printed matter, and other papers relating chiefly to Gray's time as acting director of the FBI during the Richard M. Nixon presidential administration and the impact of this period on his life in the following years. Topics include the investigation of the Watergate Affair, other FBI actions in 1972 and 1973, and changes in that institution following the death of J. Edgar Hoover.