13 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) War propaganda.

  1. Henry F. Pringle papers, 1932-1957

    7,500 items. 32 containers. 12.4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Journalist, historian, and government official. Personal and official correspondence, subject files consisting of correspondence, reports, minutes, lists, research data, and print and near-print material, and other papers relating principally to Pringle's biography of William H. Taft and to his work in the Office of Facts and Figures (later the Office of War Information).

  2. War map : pictorial and propaganda map collection 1900-1950

    180 maps. 1 book . -- Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    A collection of 180 pictorial and propaganda maps that illustrate events related to World War I, the interwar years, World War II, the formation of the United Nations, and the Cold War. While many of the pieces were created as governmental propaganda, others appeared in commercial publications, including the Star Weekly, Fortune Magazine, the Daily Mail, and the Los Angeles Examiner. Some of the maps were created by famous cartographers, such as Ernest Clegg, Fred W. Rose, Arthur Kampf, Ezra C. Stiles, Richard Edes Harrison, Ernest Dudley Chase, and F.E. Manning. Many of the collection items are described in the book titled War map: pictorial conflict maps 1900-1950 by Philip Curtis and Jakob Sondergard Pedersen, which was published in 2016. A proof of the book is part of the collection.

  3. World War II Rumor Project collection, 1942-1943

    approximately 8,000 items. 10 boxes (5 linear feet). 141 folders (approx. 8,000 sheets). 12 drawings and cartoons : graphite pencil, blue ink, newsprint. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Manuscript collection created by the Office of War Information in 1942-1943. Field representatives of various federal agencies in 42 states enlisted individuals who collected rumors generated in the United States during World War II. These individuals or "correspondents" included dentists, beauty shop operators, policemen, proprietors, and librarians who had access to rumors in their communities. Reports were submitted to Dr. Eugene Horowitz at the Bureau of Public Inquiries of OWI, who organized the materials. Rumors, jokes, rhymes, and anecdotes about the war were also collected by teachers from African American and white high school and college students; a few drawings and cartoons are included with the submissions from students.

  4. Ernst Kris and Marianne Kris papers, 1872-2018

    7,000 items. 23 containers plus 1 oversize. 9.2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Ernst Kris, psychoanalyst, educator, and art historian; and Marianne Kris, physician and psychoanalyst. Correspondence, writings, lecture notes, newspaper clippings, biographical material, and printed matter chiefly documenting Kris's academic career in psychoanalysis after his immigration to the United States in 1940.

    Please note:

    Access restrictions apply.

  5. Wallace Carroll papers, 1941-1989

    2,500 items. 7 containers plus 2 classified. 3.2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Journalist and psychological warfare strategist. Correspondence, memoranda, reports, and propaganda leaflets documenting primarily Carroll's work for the United States Office of War Information and the Psychological Strategy Board.

    Please note:

    Access restrictions apply.

  6. Writers' War Board records, 1941-1945

    73,000 items. 144 containers plus 2 oversize. 58.4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Chiefly correspondence with writers and government agencies concerning dissemination of information and propaganda during World War II, together with writings, extracts of minutes of meetings, subject files, scrapbooks, photographs, posters, and other material.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  7. Elmer Holmes Davis papers, 1865-1957

    7,800 items. 25 containers. 10 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Author, journalist, news analyst, and government official. Correspondence, manuscripts of articles and early pieces of fiction, subject file, radio scripts, biographical material, lectures and speeches, and photographs relating to Davis's career.

  8. Toni Frissell papers, 1931-1975

    4,500 items. 15 containers plus 1 oversize. 6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Photographer. Correspondence, daybooks, notes, lists, printed matter, photographs, and other papers relating to Frissell's career as a photographer.

  9. Pennell-Whistler collection, 1597-1937

    106,500 items. 408 containers plus 5 oversize. 114 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Correspondence, clippings, book drafts and galleys, articles, lecture files, and other papers of Pennell and his wife, Elizabeth Robins Pennell, relating to family affairs, his art work, their joint book publications, and to James McNeill Whistler.

  10. Francis Edwin Brennan papers, 1927-1984

    6,000 items. 22 containers. 9.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Art director, editorial consultant, and political cartoonist. Correspondence, diaries, datebooks, printed material, artwork, photographs, and other papers pertaining chiefly to Brennan's World War II service with the U.S. Office of War Information as chief of the graphics divisions in Washington, D.C., Paris, and London, and to his career as an art advisor and design consultant.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.