4 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Wilson family.

  1. Edith Bolling Galt Wilson papers, 1833-1961

    19,000 items. 71 containers. 28.4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Wife of President Woodrow Wilson. Correspondence, diary notes, drafts of Wilson's autobiography, My Memoir, financial and legal records, family and genealogical material, printed matter, memorabilia, and other papers relating largely to political and social life in Washington, D.C.

  2. Woodrow Wilson papers, 1786-1957

    278,700 items. 1,345 containers plus 51 oversize. 600 linear feet. 540 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Lawyer, author, educator, president of Princeton University, governor of New Jersey, and president of the United States. Personal, family, and official correspondence, drafts and proofs of books, articles, speeches, academic lectures, scrapbooks, shorthand notes, and memorabilla relating chiefly to Wilson's presidental administrations.

  3. Wilson-McAdoo families papers, 1860-1966

    1,093 items. 8 containers. 3 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Correspondence, writings, speeches, statements, biographical material, financial papers, clippings, photographs, and other papers primarily of Eleanor Wilson McAdoo and Margaret Woodrow Wilson, documenting the activities of the McAdoo and Wilson families.

  4. Ray Stannard Baker papers, 1836-1947

    30,000 items. 138 containers. 55.6 linear feet. 97 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Journalist and author. Correspondence, diaries, journals, notebooks, drafts of books and articles, family papers, scrapbooks, clippings, and printed matter concerning Baker's career in newspaper and magazine writing, his books, and his role in the Paris Peace Conference. Included is a large group of papers collected by Baker for his biography of Woodrow Wilson. Also includes portions of an autobiography of Robert M. La Follette (1855-1925) and material relating to Baker's study of African Americans in the Progressive era, "Following the Color Line."