92 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Wilson, Woodrow, 1856-1924.

  1. Florence Jaffray Harriman papers, 1857-1982

    10,000 items. 32 containers. 13 linear feet. 1 microfilm reel. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Diplomat, political activist, and author. Correspondence, writings, news clippings, photographs, printed matter, and miscellaneous papers relating primarily to Harriman's activities as United States minister to Norway and her political activities on behalf of the Democratic party, world peace organizations, and District of Columbia voting rights.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  2. Marian S. Carson collection of manuscripts, 1656-1995

    14,250 items. 57 containers plus 27 oversize. 26.4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collector. A collection of Americana including historical letters and documents, family and personal papers, broadsides, financial and legal papers, illustrated and printed ephemera, government and legislative documents, military records, journals, and printed matter relating primarily to the expansion and development of the United States from the colonial period through the 1876 centennial.

  3. William Dudley Foulke papers, circa 1470-1952

    2,500 items. 12 containers plus 1 oversize. 5.2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Lawyer, public official, and author from Indiana. Correspondence, diaries, journals, copybook, speeches, writings, notes, legal papers, clippings, printed material, and other papers, including a late fifteenth century fragment of the Tristram Saga obtained by Arthur Middleton Reeves on a trip to Iceland. The bulk of the collection consists of Foulke's correspondence reflecting his literary career and public service, including letters from Theodore Roosevelt discussing civil service reform, the Progressive movement, Woodrow Wilson, the World Court (Permanent Court of International Justice), and pacifism.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  4. August Heckscher papers, 1931-1999

    23,000 items. 64 containers. 26 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Writer, arts consultant, social commentator, and journalist. Correspondence, speeches, writings, and miscellaneous papers relating primarily to Heckscher's work as arts consultant to President John F. Kennedy, editorial writer at the New York Herald Tribune, director of the Twentieth Century Fund, parks commissioner and Administrator of Recreation and Cultural Affairs for the city of New York, and his work with various educational and cultural institutions.

  5. Grosvenor family papers, 1827-1981

    67,300 items. 192 containers. 76.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Correspondence, diaries, speeches and writings, subject material, financial papers, printed matter, and personal miscellany, chiefly 1872-1964, of various members of the Grosvenor family, principally of Amherst and Millbury, Mass., and Washington, D.C.

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    Some or all content stored offsite.

  6. Ray Stannard Baker papers, 1836-1947

    30,000 items. 138 containers. 55.6 linear feet. 97 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Journalist and author. Correspondence, diaries, journals, notebooks, drafts of books and articles, family papers, scrapbooks, clippings, and printed matter concerning Baker's career in newspaper and magazine writing, his books, and his role in the Paris Peace Conference. Included is a large group of papers collected by Baker for his biography of Woodrow Wilson. Also includes portions of an autobiography of Robert M. La Follette (1855-1925) and material relating to Baker's study of African Americans in the Progressive era, "Following the Color Line."

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  7. La Follette family papers, 1781-1988

    418,100 items. 1,468 containers plus 22 oversize. 594.2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Family active in late nineteenth and early twentieth century national politics. Correspondence, diaries, speeches and writings, legal files, office files, campaign files, legislative files, subject files, financial records, biographical research files, newspaper clippings, printed matter, and miscellany principally documenting the careers of Robert M. La Follette (1855-1925), governor of Wisconsin and United States representative and senator, and his son Robert M. La Follette (1895-1953), United States senator. Also includes papers of Belle Case La Follette, Fola La Follette, and Philip Fox La Follette.

  8. Waddy B. Wood papers, 1885-1941

    2,400 items. 6 containers. 2.4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Architect of Washington, D.C. Correspondence, writings, speeches, contracts, and other papers relating chiefly to Waddy B. Wood's career as an architect and designer in Washington, D.C. Also documented in the collection is Wood's involvement with the American Institute of Architects and the Democratic Party.

  9. Wilson-McAdoo families papers, 1860-1966

    1,093 items. 8 containers. 3 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Correspondence, writings, speeches, statements, biographical material, financial papers, clippings, photographs, and other papers primarily of Eleanor Wilson McAdoo and Margaret Woodrow Wilson, documenting the activities of the McAdoo and Wilson families.

  10. Newton Diehl Baker papers, 1896-1962

    100,000 items. 276 containers. 110.4 linear feet. 31 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    U.S. secretary of war, author, lawyer, and municipal official of Cleveland, Ohio. Correspondence, memoranda, minutes, reports, speeches and articles, newspaper articles, and printed material relating primarily to Baker's post-World War I activities as the head of several business firms and of organizations devoted to education, law and jurisprudence, and philanthropy, relief, and other types of human services.