5 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Women--United States--History.

  1. National Society of the Colonial Dames of America. Colonial and Pioneer Women Project records, 1852-1982

    200 items. 8 containers plus 1 oversize. 3 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    National organization, founded in 1891, composed of women who are descended from an ancestor who came to reside in an American colony before 1750, and whose services were rendered during the Colonial Period. Chiefly essays on the lives of colonial and pioneer women written for the Colonial and Pioneer Women Project by members of state organizations and submitted to the society's National Historical Activities Committee. Subjects of the essays are women of local prominence or ancestors of the authors.

  2. Marian S. Carson collection of manuscripts, 1656-1995

    14,250 items. 57 containers plus 27 oversize. 26.4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collector. A collection of Americana including historical letters and documents, family and personal papers, broadsides, financial and legal papers, illustrated and printed ephemera, government and legislative documents, military records, journals, and printed matter relating primarily to the expansion and development of the United States from the colonial period through the 1876 centennial.

  3. E.F. Ellet correspondence with index, 1842-1865

    185 items. 1 container. .2 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Author, poet, and historian. Correspondence with index relating to her research for The Women of the American Revolution.

  4. John Carvel Arnold papers, 1856-1937

    190 items. 1 container. .4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Laborer and Union soldier. Principally correspondence of Arnold with his wife, Mary Ann, while he served in the 49th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment during the Civil War, and Mrs. Arnold's postwar correspondence with their children.

  5. Willard family papers, 1800-1968

    126,000 items. 539 containers plus 6 oversize. 187.6 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Correspondence, letterbooks, notebooks, diaries, subject files, business and financial records, and other papers documenting the family's involvement in the business, social, and political life of Virginia and Washington, D.C.