170 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Women.

  1. Anna Kelton Wiley papers, 1798-1964

    110,000 items. 362 containers plus 4 oversize. 147 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Consumers' rights reformer, feminist, and clubwoman of Washington, D.C. Correspondence, speeches and articles, financial papers, appointment books, family papers, invitations, notes, scrapbooks, clippings, photographs, and printed material relating to Wiley's activities on behalf of women's rights and her membership and work in many associations and clubs. Included are papers relating to her husband, Harvey Washington Wiley (1844-1930); father, J. C. Kelton (1828-1893); and grandfather, William S. Campbell.

  2. Susan B. Anthony Foundation, Washington, D.C., records, 1895-1943

    1,300 items. 6 containers. 2.4 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Organization founded to promote women's issues. Correspondence, bylaws and constitution, minutes, reports, financial records, membership lists, scrapbook, clippings, printed matter, and other material related to the foundation, which from its establishment in 1912 until 1924 was known as the Anthony League of the District of Columbia.

  3. Bess Furman papers, 1728-1967

    47,000 items. 155 containers plus 4 oversize. 70 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Author and journalist. Correspondence, diaries, family papers, subject files, speeches and writings, financial records, scrapbooks, and miscellany relating primarily to Furman's family, personal life, and career as a journalist and author.

  4. American Psychological Association records, 1917-1986

    270,000 items. 725 containers. 290 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Professional organization for psychologists founded in 1892 to advance psychology as a science, as a profession, and as a means of promoting human welfare. Correspondence, memoranda, minutes of meetings, drafts of books, articles, and lectures, congressional testimony, reports, agendas, ballots, financial data, printed matter, and other records chiefly documenting the organization and management of the association's boards, committees, and publications. Includes the personal records of some of its executives.

  5. Hugh H. Smythe and Mabel M. Smythe papers, circa 1895-1997

    36,500 items. 105 containers plus 1 classified. 42 linear feet. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Diplomats, educators, and scholars. Correspondence, memoranda, minutes, photographs, reports, writings, subject files and other papers relating to the Smythes’ ambassadorships to Cameroon, Malta, and Syria and their work on African and African-American issues with a variety of organizations and educational institutions.

  6. National Urban League records, 1900-1988

    616,000 items. 2,000 containers plus 2 oversize. 821 linear feet. 18 microfilm reels. -- Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Civil rights organization. Correspondence, minutes of meetings, speeches, reports, surveys, statistical data, financial and legal records, scrapbooks, printed material, and other records relating to the programs and policies of the league and its affiliates.

  7. Selma Epstein collection, 1931-1987

    72 items. 5 containers. 2.6 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Selma Epstein (1927-2014) was a concert pianist, teacher, promoter of contemporary music, and champion of 20th-century black and female composers. The collection contains contemporary music scores, many by women and African-American composers, as well as a small amount of clippings and promotional materials.

  8. May O'Donnell papers, 1929-2004

    160 items. 1 container. 0.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    May O'Donnell was an American dancer, choreographer, and teacher; she performed in the original casts of seminal works by Martha Graham, and through her own choreography became known as among the earliest choreographers of abstract works. Her husband, Ray Green, composed music for many of her dance works. This small collection offers photographs, playbills and publicity, and reviews and other publications documenting some of her most distinctive achievements.

  9. Florence Parr-Gere papers, 1856-1964

    344 items. 5 containers. 3.0 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Florence Parr-Gere, born in Canada and longtime resident of New York, was a pianist and composer. Her papers contain published music, photographs, clippings, correspondence, a scrapbook, publicity materials, posters and other materials related to her experiences at the American Conservatory at Fontainebleau and lifelong musical pursuits.

  10. Ruth Page correspondence on Billy Sunday, 1944-1960

    148 items. 1 container. 0.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    This collection consists primarily of the correspondence between American dancer-choreographer and company director Ruth Page or her first husband attorney Thomas Hart Fisher and composer Remi Gassmann, who was contracted to create the music score for Page’s ballet Billy Sunday (1948). Other letters to Gassmann from this period and a small number of programs and press clippings related to Page's or Gassmann's careers round out the collection.