59 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s) Writings (Documents).

  1. Glenn Dillard Gunn papers, 1802-1961

    approximately 750 items. 14 boxes. 4.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Glenn Dillard Gunn was an American pianist, conductor, music critic, and teacher. The collection contains correspondence from notable musical figures such as Ferruccio Busoni, Teresa Careño, Percy Grainger, and Moriz Rosenthal, as well as writings by and about Gunn, photographs, annotated printed scores, scrapbooks, and other items that document Gunn's life and career.

  2. Aaron Copland collection, 1841-1991

    around 400,000 items. 567 boxes. 306 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Aaron Copland Collection consists of published and unpublished music by Copland and other composers, correspondence, writings, biographical material, datebooks, journals, professional papers including legal and financial material, photographs, awards, art work, and books. Of particular interest is the correspondence with Nadia Boulanger, which extent over 50 years, and with his long-time friend, Harold Clurman. Other significant correspondents are Leonard Bernstein, Paul Bowles, Benjamin Britten, Carlos Chávez, David Diamond, Roy Harris, Charles Ives, Claire Reis, Arnold Schoenberg, Roger Sessions, and Virgil Thomson. The photographic collection of Copland's friend and confidant Victor Kraft, a professional photographer, forms part of the collection.

  3. Serge Koussevitzky archive, 1880-1978

    around 200,000 items. 505 containers. 224 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Serge Koussevitzky was a Russian-born conductor, composer, and double bassist. The archive includes correspondence, personal and business papers, photographs, writings, clippings, scrapbooks, programs, and other materials which serve as a record of Koussevitzky's life and career, and document some of the most significant aspects of twentieth-century music. Through his work as a conductor and publisher, and his efforts to commission new musical works, Koussevitzky maintained deep ties with many of the finest composers and musicians of the day. These figures are represented in their personal and professional affiliations with the conductor. The collection extensively chronicles periods in the history of organizations such as the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Berkshire Music Center, the Koussevitzky Music Foundation, and the American International Music Fund. Material in the collection dates from Koussevitzky's years in his native Russia and also contains material created after Koussevitzky's death, reflecting his widow Olga's continuing work with various organizations and projects. Musical compositions commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky are part of the Serge Koussevitzky Music Foundation Collection, and are shelved in ML30.3c, ML30.3c2, ML30.3c3, and ML30.3e2.

  4. Ernst Bacon collection, 1898-1990

    approximately 6,000 items. 54 boxes. 16 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Ernst Bacon was an American composer, pianist, and conductor. Largely a self-taught composer, Bacon also became an esteemed administrator and educator, serving as director of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) Federal Music Project in 1935 and later as composer-in-residence at Syracuse University from 1947-1963. The collection contains music, writings, correspondence, iconography, programs, clippings, publicity materials, and other miscellaneous items.

  5. George and Böske Antheil papers, circa 1875-1984

    approximately 6,500 items. 43 containers. 17.5 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    George Antheil was a composer, pianist, author and inventor. The collection consists of materials related to the professional and personal activities of George Antheil and his wife, Elizabeth (Böske) Antheil. It contains holograph music manuscripts, printed scores, published and unpublished writings, business and personal correspondence, subject files, photographs, programs and promotional materials, scrapbooks, artwork, biographical materials, and memorabilia which document the life of this influential composer and his family.

    Please note:

    Some or all content stored offsite.

  6. Ragheb Moftah collection of Coptic Orthodox liturgical chants and hymns, 1926-2018

    circa 3,000 items. 18 boxes. 6 linear feet. 988 files (657 MB). -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection consists of transcriptions of Coptic chant music by Ernest Newlandsmith and Margit Toth. Both contain transcriptions of the Liturgy of St. Basil. Basil. Marian Robertson Wilson created a guide to Moftah's audio tapes in 1996, which consists of transcriptions, transliterations and translations into English of the texts sung on the tapes. Wilson also devised a new order for the pieces on the tapes, putting them in a more logical order, as used in the context of the liturgy. Included is also correspondence, most importantly of letters from Ernest Newlandsmith to Ragheb Moftah concerning their collaboration. Writings in the collection consist of articles by Moftah and an autobiography, both manuscript and printed. There are notes about chant written by Moftah. The collection also contains articles written by Marian Robertson Wilson concerning Coptic chant from the transcriptions Moftah contracted. Other materials include clippings, tickets, receipts, photographs and a few legal papers.

  7. Charles Mingus collection, 1925-2015

    approximately 15,000 items. 76 boxes. 35 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Charles Mingus was a jazz double bassist, band leader, and composer. A prolific recording artist and pioneer in double bass technique, Mingus composed works that often incorporated elements of hard bop and gospel music and featured collective improvisation. The collection includes manuscript and printed music by Mingus; writings; correspondence; business papers; clippings; programs; publicity materials; photographs of Mingus, his family, and colleagues, such as Eric Dolphy, Dannie Richmond, Max Roach, Oscar Pettiford, and Miles Davis; artwork and artifacts; and sound recordings.

  8. Nikolai Lopatnikoff collection, 1916-1979

    around 1085 items. 27 boxes. 37 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection includes music, manuscript and printed, of Lopatnikoff, as well as of other composers; correspondence and personal papers; photographs, clippings, and programs; writings by and about Lopatnikoff; and offical documents. A significant amount of material is related to Lopatnikoff's opera Danton. Among the correspondents are Rudolf Bing, Aaron Copland, Serge Koussevitzky, Joseph Rosenstock, Julius Rudel, Nicolas Slonimsky, and William Steinberg.

  9. Lester Horton Dance Theater collection, 1918-1996

    approximately 11,600 items. 55 containers. 30.75 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Lester Horton Dance Theater was a modern dance company and school in Los Angeles in the 1940s and 1950s. Founded by dancer and choreographer Lester Horton (1906-1953), the company served as an incubator for the careers of a generation of dancers, including Alvin Ailey, Carmen de Lavallade, Bella Lewitzky, James Mitchell, Joyce Trisler, and James Truitte. The collection documents Horton's early life and career and the Dance Theater's activities under the management of Frank Eng after Horton's death. Materials include clippings, correspondence, costume and set designs, course descriptions, drawings, financial documents, music, photographs, programs, promotional materials, writings, and typed choreographic scenarios.

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    Access restrictions apply.

  10. Vernon Duke collection, 1918-1968

    around 17,500 items. 146 boxes. 52 linear feet. -- Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Vernon Duke (born Vladimir Dukelsky) was an American composer and songwriter. He rose to success in the 1930s with hit songs such as "April in Paris" and "Autumn in New York" and later collaborated with many leading composers and lyricists of the period, including George and Ira Gershwin, Serge Prokofiev, and Serge Koussevitzky. The collection contains manuscript and printed music, correspondence, subject files, photographs, and other materials related to his career.