27 finding aid(s) found containing the word(s)

  1. Gwilym Davies Appalachian and Adirondack Mountains collection, 1997-1998

    10 items. 9 sound recordings : digital audio files, WAV. 1 manuscript : digital text file. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Field recordings of songs and tales from Virginia, West Virginia, and New York State (Appalachian and Adirondack Mountains) made by Gwilym Davies in 1997 and 1998. Performers recorded include Spencer Moore of Chilhowie, VA; Phyllis Marks of Glenville, West Virginia, in the company of Helena Triplett of Elkins, West Virginia; Rita Emerson of Glenville, West Virginia; Russell Lehew of Mannington, West Virginia; Dick Richards of Lake Luzerne, Saratoga, New York; Catherine Charron Labier of Whitehall, New York; Jim Cleveland and Colleen Cleveland of Brant Lake, New York.

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  2. Eleanor Dickinson collection, 1901-2004

    manuscripts: 90 folders.. preservation tapes: 99 sound tape reels (261 hrs. 30 min.) : analog, 2 track, various speeds ; 10 in.. 86 sound cassettes : analog.. 170 video reels ; various sizes.. 11 videocassettes ; various sizes.. 18 photographic prints : black and white ; 3 x 5 in.. 17 color slides.. 222 powerpoint slides : digital prints, grayscale.. 2 artifacts.. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    This collection of video recordings, sound recordings, manuscripts, photographs, graphic materials, and artifacts documents Protestant religious revival meetings of various denominations in the southern Appalachian region, primarily in Tennessee, West Virginia, Kentucky, Virginia, and Georgia. The collection includes interviews with church leaders and members of congregations, and documentation of religious services, healing services, revivals, hymn singing, sermons, snake handling, and other religious rites and customs recorded by Eleanor Dickinson from 1968 to 1991. Other topics include beekeeping, church roadside signs, religious quilts, snake hunting, drinking strychnine, decorating graves in cemeteries, church dinners, and more. Included are some religious and secular radio programs recorded by Dickinson, including programs from Nashville, Tennessee, featuring bluegrass music, and a program featuring Paul Simon; and documentation of Protestant revivals in Oakland and San Francisco, California. Dickinson's interviews with visionary artist Rev. Howard Finster on various occasions between August 1, 1981 and July 25, 1991 in Summerville, Georgia, are included in the collection. The collection also includes audio logs and transcripts, video logs, the collector's powerpoint presentations (2004), documentation of Dickinson's exhibition, "Revival!," at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in 1970; and other manuscripts.

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  3. 1982 Neptune Plaza Concert Series collection, 1982

    8 folders. 13 sound tape reels : analog, 7 1/2 ips, 2 track, mono. ; 10 in.. 181 photographs : black and white, negatives. 173 slides : color. 5 photographic prints : black and white ; various sizes. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection consists of manuscript materials, sound recordings, and photographs documenting the performance of Irish music, Ghanaian music and dance, Japanese koto music, Mexican string band music, Senegalese music, and West Virginia old-time music recorded live outdoors on Neptune Plaza in front of the Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, at concerts from April through October 1982, sponsored by the American Folklife Center and the National Council for the Traditional Arts.

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  4. Fletcher Collins Jr. collection, 1935-1944

    ca. 1000 leaves (22 folders) in 2 boxes. 21 sound discs : analog ; 12 in.. 12 sound discs : analog ; 12 in.. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Fletcher Collins Jr. Collection is the result of the Anglo-American folksong collecting activities of Fletcher Collins Jr. from the mid-1930s to the early 1940s in North Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia, under the auspices of the WPA Joint Committee on Folk Arts and for the Library of Congress Archive of Folk Song.

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  5. Lands' End all-American quilt collection, 1992-1997

    61.5 linear feet (154 boxes). Total approximately 80,543 items.. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The collection consists of photographs of quilts and quilters, essays, entry forms, and a few fabric and needlework samples submitted in three nationwide contests in 1992, 1994, and 1996 sponsored by Coming Home, a division of Lands’ End, Inc. home shopping service, and Good Housekeeping magazine. Approximately 13,100 entries for the three contests came from all 50 states and the District of Columbia with a few from Canada. Many styles of needlework, quilting, patchwork, appliqué, and embroidery are represented in the visual materials. The collection also includes correspondence and surveys from some contestants and administrative files related to judging the entries, exhibitions, and publicity.

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  6. World War II Rumor Project collection, 1942-1943

    approximately 8,000 items. 10 boxes (5 linear feet). 141 folders (approx. 8,000 sheets). 12 drawings and cartoons : graphite pencil, blue ink, newsprint. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Manuscript collection created by the Office of War Information in 1942-1943. Field representatives of various federal agencies in 42 states enlisted individuals who collected rumors generated in the United States during World War II. These individuals or "correspondents" included dentists, beauty shop operators, policemen, proprietors, and librarians who had access to rumors in their communities. Reports were submitted to Dr. Eugene Horowitz at the Bureau of Public Inquiries of OWI, who organized the materials. Rumors, jokes, rhymes, and anecdotes about the war were also collected by teachers from African American and white high school and college students; a few drawings and cartoons are included with the submissions from students.

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  7. Joseph C. Mele collection of dialect recordings from the University of South Alabama

    346 items.. sound recordings: 346 sound cassettes (C-60) : analog.. manuscripts: 1 folder (17 pages). -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collection of audio recordings of American English dialects from the University of South Alabama, Doy Leale McCall Rare Book & Manuscript Library's Dialect Tape Center collection created by Professor Joseph C. Mele, a former faculty member, between 1975-1980. The collection includes 346 audiocassettes of 30-minute dialect samples recorded by Mele and other recordists (agents) of individuals in 31 states, as well as 42 recordings of English spoken by non-Americans from 23 different countries. Samples generally consist of two parts: an impromptu monologue and a 44-sentence sequence highlighting each English phoneme.

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  8. 1992 Neptune Plaza Concert Series collection, 1992

    8 folders in 2 boxes (1 linear foot).. 7 sound tape reels : analog: 7 1⁄2 ips, 2 track, stereo; 10 in.. 1 sound tape reel : analog: 7 1⁄2 ips, 2 track, stereo; 7 in.. 3 sound cassettes (270 minutes): analog.. 41 negatives; black and white.. 28 photographic prints : black and white, color ; 8x10 in. and smaller.. 49 slides : color. 516 photographs: on 23 contact sheets, black and white.. 7 videocassettes (VHS): sound, color; 1/2 inch.. 1 computer disk; 3 1⁄2 in.. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Manuscript materials, sound recordings, photographs, and moving images documenting the performance of Puerto Rican folk music; Tennesse old-time music; folk music from Veracruz, Mexico; dances of the Tewa Indians from the Santa Clara Pueblo; Irish folk dance and music; gospel music; and bluegrass music recorded live outdoors on Neptune Plaza in front of the Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, at concerts from April through September 1992, sponsored by the American Folklife Center. Some concerts were recorded for broadcast on WAMU-FM, hosted by Dick Spottswood. Manuscripts include some correspondence and program flyers autographed by the performers.

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  9. Square dance legislation collection, 1975-1995

    0.8 linear feet . (2 boxes) including 405 manuscript items. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    The Square Dance Legislation Collection consists of manuscript materials (1975-1995) compiled by the American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, documenting the history of legislative efforts to designate the square dance as a national or state folk dance. The bulk of the materials concerns the public hearing on House Resolution 1706 held June 28,1984 before the Subcommittee on Census and Population of the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service, House of Representatives, 98th Congress to "designate the square dance as the national folk dance of the United States."

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  10. John A. Lomax and Alan Lomax papers, 1907-1969

    approximately 4900 items; 14 boxes; 5.6 linear feet.. -- American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

    Summary:

    Collection of correspondence, research notes, transcripts, sheet music, manuscript music transcriptions, song texts, song books, maps, and administrative documents dating primarily from the tenure of John A. Lomax and his son Alan Lomax at the Archive of American Folk Song, Library of Congress, from 1932-1942, but with a few items dating to the 1960s. Correspondents include various staff at the Library of Congress, in particular, Harold Spivacke; and folklorists, musicians, writers, academics, film directors, and others, including Huddie "Lead Belly" Ledbetter and Woody Guthrie; various government agencies including the Works Progress Administration, Federal Writers' Project, and War Department; broadcasting and record companies; publishers; and fans of Alan Lomax's radio shows, who sent in contributions of folk songs and folklore from their childhood and communities. Documents include drafts of speeches, lectures, articles, and drafts of their books for publication.

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