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Series 8: Sound recordings (continued)
Subseries 3: TV and radio broadcasts (continued)
"Blue Monday Blues," #1 (part 1 of 2), undated (continued)
Vendor's digitization note: The program is distorted at times, and there is significant hum.
Logger's note: Johnny Young is the featured guest.
Time Content
Start PW made an introduction: Tonight's program is an extensive interview and excerpts of Johnny Young, one of the finest guitarists, singers and mandolinists in the modern blues in Chicago.
00:02:24 "Keep Your Nose Out of My Business" by Johnny Young and his band
00:05:35 PW asks: How do you got started with playing mandolin?
00:05:50 JY answers that he was born on Vicksburg, Mississippi. In his childhood, he was influenced by his uncle who was a musician. At around nine years old, he was experimenting making a mandolin out of a cigar box.
00:07:07 "Stealin'"
00:09:45 JY mentions his uncle would play with his band members in the suburbs.
00:10:56 An unidentified blues song. Lyrics: "I am leaving, Baby I ain't gonna be around no more..."
00:14:08 JY mentions that the band plays more blues than waltz around 1926. He then talks about playing on his home-made mandolin about a year before he plays on a real one. He particularly remembers the songs played by the group "Mississippi Sheiks" in Rolling Fork, Mississippi. JY mostly plays songs composed by other people. He also talks about the musician Walter Vincent who plays country blues with the group.
00:20:58 "My Black Mare"
00:23:55 JY talks about the musician Charlie [inaudible] who plays instruments like a clown.
00:26:42 PW makes closing remarks.
00:27:54 End
Item-ID: AFC 2011/053: SR497 "Blue Monday Blues," #2 (part 2 of 2), circa 1966
Rack number: RXH 4737
Extent: 1 sound tape reel (00:33:04) : analog, 7 1/2 ips, mono ; 7 in.
Logger's note: Johnny Young is the featured guest.
Time Content
Start Pete Welding (PW) makes an opening remark and advertises Big John's club in Old Town Chicago where featured bands perform live on the stage.
00:01:09 PW: The interview with Johnny Young, guitarist, singer, and mandolinist, continues. The first part of the show is about his Mississippi years. The second half is about his life in Chicago. Johnny Young (JY) mentions that he moved back from Chicago to Vicksburg, Mississippi, at the age of 21, in 1941 when the war began. While he stayed in Chicago Heights area, he met many musicians such as Big Bill, who played electric guitar. In those years, JY and Muddy used to follow Sonny Boy around. JY mentions that Muddy played the blues with his trademark bottle-neck style. Later JY played in the Maxwell Street market in 1946, along with Moody Jones and Snooky Pryor. After playing on the street for some time, finally JY recorded a record under his name.
00:07:11 "Money Taking Woman" composed and performed by Johnny Young, on the Ora Nelle label
00:09:43 PW asks about JY's cousin, Johnny Williams, who was featured on the same record. JY says they started playing at the age 10.
00:10:24 "Worried Man Blues" composed and performed by Johnny Williams.
00:13:00 PW asks about JY's other record after 1948: "Let Me Ride Your Mule" and "My Baby Walked Out On Me." After that JY stopped making records until he met Pete Welding, who produced Modern Chicago Blues. The record features one of JY's songs "My Baby Walked Out In 1954."
00:15:03 "My Baby Walked Out In 1954"
00:17:20 PW asks about JY's collaboration with the harmonica player John Wrencher.
00:18:14 "I'm Going to Detroit," guitar by John Lee Granderson, mandolin by Johnny Young, vocals and harmonica by John Wrencher.
00:21:08 PW ask about JY's recent participation in several recording sessions for various labels. One of them is a Vanguard label record Chicago/The Blues/Today!, in which Samuel Charters asked nine different blues artists to record songs. JY mentions that Samuel Charters loved his performance.
00:21:45 "Tighten Up on It" by Johnny Young's South Side Blues Band
00:24:55 JY talks about his recording for Arhoolie Records.
00:25:02 "Wild, Wild Woman" by Johnny Young and his Chicago Blues Band
00:27:43 PW ask JY what he thinks the blues are. JY answers blues are songs of low down when people feel low down way back from the slavery time. Blues are something that would hit you, make you sorrow, and make you think of things.
00:28:50 PW made a closing remark for the program.
00:30:07 "I'm Having A Ball" by Johnny Young and his Chicago Blues Band.
00:33:04 End
Item-ID: AFC 2011/053: SR498 "Blue Monday Blues," #3 (part 2 of 2), circa 1964-1966
Rack number: RXH 4738
Extent: 1 sound tape reel (00:28:56) : analog, 7 1/2 ips, mono ; 7 in.
Vendor's digitization note: The program is distored at times and has significant hum.
Time Content
Start Pete Welding (PW) makes an opening remark and advertises the Big John's club in Old Town Chicago where featured bands perform live on the stage.
00:02:06 "Red Headed Woman" by "Baby Face" Leroy Foster. Performers: Leroy Foster, vocal and guitar; Muddy Water, lead guitar; Harmonica solo by Little Walter.
00:04:52 PW presents another song from the same record as above - "Moonshine Baby" by "Baby Face" Leroy Foster. Performers: Muddy Waters, lead guitar; Leroy Foster, 2nd guitar.
00:08:06 PW mentions Muddy Waters' recorded several novelty blues such as "Tiger in Your Tank" and "Got My Mojo Working." The following selection doesn't go farther, which features a superb chromatic harmonica solo by Little Walter.
00:08:25 "Don't Go No Farther" by Muddy Waters.
00:11:18 PW introduces another blues artist from Chicago, Kokomo Arnold.
00:11:46 "Midnight Blues" by Kokomo Arnold
00:14:32 PW mentions that Georgia Tom (Thomas A. Dorsey) is a noted gospel song performer, and introduces his "Levee Bound Blues" on a 1930 Decca label.
00:15:04 "Levee Bound Blues" by Thomas A. Dorsey
00:17:41 PW introduces a post-war recording by Jesse Thomas: "Gonna Write You A Letter" (1949).
00:17:58 "Gonna Write You A Letter" by Jesse Thomas (vocal, guitar)
00:20:50 PW talks about a later Mississippi blues singer and guitarist: Johnny Temple, who is well known for the song "Louise Louise Blues."
00:21:43 "Louise Louise Blues" by Johnny Temple.
00:24:15 PW introduces "Traveling Man Blues": very fine vocal and guitar playing by Tony Hollins, recorded in Chicago in 1941.
00:24:45 "Traveling Man Blues" by Tony Hollins
00:27:36 PW makes a closing remark for the program.
00:28:56 End
Item-ID: AFC 2011/053: SR499 "Blue Monday Blues," #4 (part 1 of 2), circa 1964-1966
Rack number: RXH 4739
Extent: 1 sound tape reel (00:30:54) : analog, 7 1/2 ips, mono ; 7 in.
Vendor's digitization note: The program is distored at times and has significant hum.
Logger's note: This show features discussion of the development of the blues style in Chicago.
Time Content
Start Pete Welding (PW) makes an opening remark and advertises the Big John's club in Old Town Chicago where featured bands perform live on the stage. In this episode he will introduces several blues works developed out of the Muddy Waters' band.
00:02:06 PW introduces the song "Last Night I Lost The Best Friend" by Little Walter, which features a magnificent harmonica solo.
00:02:58 "Last Night I Lost The Best Friend" by Little Walter
00:05:40 PW talks about Little Walter successful recordings that features his fine harmonica performance. The blues song "Off The Wall" was included in one of his best records called The Best of Little Walter.
00:06:10 "Off The Wall" by Little Walter
00:08:58 PW introduces another harmonica player Walter Horton, known as Big Walter (Horton) or Walter "Shakey" Horton. He was a very fine harmonica player from the Memphis, Tennessee are. He succeeded Little Walter in the Muddy Water's band.
00:09:53 "Hard Hearted Woman" by Big Walter Horton
00:12:52 PW talks about harmonica player Junior Wells, who recorded a beautiful blues song "Hoodoo Man Blues" with Junior Wells on vocal, Big Walter on guitar, David Miles on 2nd guitar, Henry Gray on piano, and Fred Below on drums.
00:13:43 "Hoodoo Man Blues" by Junior Wells
00:16:43 PW introduces a great harmonica piece performed by Junior Wells.
00:17:05 An unidentified instrumental harmonica piece by Junior Wells.
00:19:58 PW mentions about another great blues artist in Chicago, though born in Mississippi - Johnny Shines.
00:21:05 "Ramblin' Blues" by Johnny Shines
00:23:35 PW introduces a blues piece composed by Johnny Shines - "Brutal Hearted Woman," featured Johnny Shines and Big Walter's magnificent performance on the harmonica.
00:24:13 "Brutal Hearted Woman" by Johnny Shines
00:27:06 PW introduces a final selection by Johnny Shines, also featuring Big Walter's harmonica playing.
00:27:20 "Evening Sun" by Johnny Shines
00:29:47 PW makes a closing remark for the program.
00:30:54 End
Item-ID: AFC 2011/053: SR500 "Blue Monday Blues," #5 (part 1 of 2), circa 1964-1966
Rack number: RXH 4740
Extent: 1 sound tape reel (00:27:31) : analog, 7 1/2 ips, mono ; 7 in.
Vendor's digitization note: The program is distored at times and has significant hum.
Logger's note: This show features discussion of the development of the blues style in Chicago.
Time Content
Start Pete Welding (PW) makes an opening remark and advertises the Big John's club in Old Town Chicago where featured bands perform live on the stage. PW: The evolution of the modern blues style can be suggested by comparison of three Muddy Water's recordings from different periods of his recording career. This number - "Walking Blues" - is from his early onset of his recording activities.
00:03:01 "Walking Blues" by Muddy Waters, accompanied by the bassist Big Crawford.
00:04:30 PW introduces the mature style of Muddy Waters - an exciting ensemble style in which all the instruments were amplified.
00:05:10 "Just to be With You" (excerpt)
00:06:36 PW talks about Muddy Water's later development of blues. "Walkin' Through the Park" has a brisk exciting momentum of the rhythm that is much more important than the lyric content of the song.
00:07:02 "Walkin' Through the Park" (excerpt)
00:08:34 PW mentions that the leaders of the new blues style came from the Muddy Water's bands such as "Baby Face" Leroy Foster. Foster's "Boll Weevil" dealt with country theme, with which the audience was familiar.
00:09:47 "Boll Weevil" (excerpt)
00:12:20 PW talks about Little Walter Jacobs, a harmonica player, started from Muddy Water's band and set out on his own.
00:12:20 "Muskadine Blues" by Little Walter Jacobs, accompanied by Muddy Walter on guitar
00:16:02 PW talks about how in early 1950 Little Walter Jacobs formed his own band and recorded a few records.
00:16:20 "Blues with a Feeling" by Little Walter Jacobs
00:19:25 PW: The biggest success of Little Walter Jacobs is the remake an old spiritual which was called "This Train." Little Walter gave it a more secular lyrics and called his version "My Babe."
00:19:50 "My Babe" by Little Walter Jacobs
00:22:25 PW: Little Walter Jacobs is best known in the modern blues for his brilliant playing on the amplifier harmonica. Perhaps one of his finest harmonica solo is the instrumental song "Juke" from "The Best of Little Walter" album.
00:23:24 "Juke" by Little Walter Jacobs
00:26:08 PW makes a closing remark of the program.
00:27:31 End
Item-ID: AFC 2011/053: SR501 "Blue Monday Blues," #6 (part 1 of 2), circa 1964-1966
Rack number: RXH 4741
Extent: 1 sound tape reel (00:29:46) : analog, 7 1/2 ips, mono ; 7 in.
Vendor's digitization note: The program is distored at times and has significant hum.
Logger's note: This show features discussion of the development of the blues style in Chicago.
Time Content
Start Pete Welding (PW) makes an opening remark and advertises the Big John's club in Old Town Chicago where featured bands perform live on the stage. PW: The modern style of blues was developed in a small Chicago club in the year following World War II. But to understand the genesis of the style, one must go back to 1941. McKinley Morganfield [Leadbelly] was recorded on Stovall plantation near Rolling Fork, Mississippi, by a mobile recording team from the Library of Congress, led by Alan Lomax.
00:03:33 "Country Blues" by McKinley Morganfield [Leadbelly]
00:06:55 PW: "Country Blues" is country style performance of old Mississippi Delta style, and was patented on an album called The Walking Blues, recorded by a Delta bluesman, Robert Johnson, a gifted poet and musician of blues.
00:07:55 "Country Blues" by Robert Johnson
00:10:25 PW compares the modern urban style of blues and the original southern style.
00:12:52 "I Can't Be Satisfied" by Muddy Waters.
00:15:35 PW talks about a new form begins to emerge, in which the 2nd guitar line of Little Walter Jacobs was added to Muddy's lead guitar and Big Crawford's bass.
00:16:36 "Honey Bee" by Muddy Waters.
00:19:56 PW discusses Sonny Boy Williamson's influence on Little Walter for his harmonica solo voice style.
00:21:40 "Louisiana Blues," harmonica by Little Walter, lead guitar by Muddy Waters, and bass by Big Crawford
00:24:30 PW presents an example that represents the sound of the modern blues. In the band numbers, the roles of the instruments - guitar, second guitar, harmonica, piano, bass and drums, have been simplified individually so the totality of produced would be strong and brilliant as a whole. The electronic sound of the instruments further demands its simplification.
00:25:28 "I Just Want To Make Love To You" by Muddy Waters
00:28:16 PW makes a closing remark for the program.
00:29:46 End
Item-ID: AFC 2011/053: SR502 "Blue Monday Blues," #7 (part 1 of 2), circa 1965
Rack number: RXH 4742
Extent: 1 sound tape reel (00:28:35) : analog, 7 1/2 ips, mono ; 7 in.
Vendor's digitization note: The program is distored at times and has significant hum.
Logger's note: This show features discussion of the development of the blues style in Chicago.
Time Content
Start Pete Welding (PW) makes an opening remark and advertises the Big John's club in Old Town Chicago where featured bands perform live on the stage. PW: Today's program will focus on Rice Miller (Sonny Boy Williamson II), an influential post-war artist. Here is one of his early influential songs, "Nine Below Zero," recorded in 1950.
00:02:50 "Nine Below Zero" by Rice Miller (Sonny Boy Williamson II)
00:05:35 PW: Considerable confusion exists about Rice Miller. He claimed to be the original "Sonny Boy Williamson." This is to distinguish him from the performer John Lee Williamson, who recorded extensively in the late 30s and 40s as Sonny Boy Williamson. Here is a moody and introspective performance recorded in Rice Miller's early years.
00:07:52 "Mighty Long Time" by Rice Miller (Sonny Boy Williamson II), guitar and harmonica
00:10:42 PW mentions that Sonny Boy Williamson II is such a unique performer and quotes a description of style written by a British Blues critic Paul Oliver.
00:12:54 "Eyesight to the Blind" by Sonny Boy Williamson II
00:15:55 PW talks about Sonny Boy Williamson II's excellent ability as a blues poet.
00:16:26 "Don't Start Me to Talkin'" by Sonny Boy Williamson II
00:18:55 PW introduce another Sonny Boy Williamson II's song notable for the lyric content.
00:19:10 "Fattening Frogs for Snakes" - Sonny Boy Williamson II
00:21:20 PW: This next piece has a good rocking background. It is very much in the modern style of instrumental work developed in the Chicago area in the post-war years.
00:21:40 "Checkin' Up On My Baby" by Sonny Boy Williamson II
00:23:35 PW introduces one of his most sensitive performances.
00:23:47 "Sad To Be Alone" by Sonny Boy Williamson II
00:26:40 PW makes a closing remark for the program.
00:28:35 End
Item-ID: AFC 2011/053: SR503 "Blue Monday Blues," #8 (part 1 of 2), undated
Rack number: RXH 5365
Extent: 1 sound tape reel (00:29:41) : analog, 7 1/2 ips, mono ; 7 in.
Vendor's digitization note: The program is distored at times and has significant hum.
Logger's note: This show features discussion of the development of the blues style in Chicago.
Time Content
Start Pete Welding (PW) makes an opening remark and advertises the Big John's club in Old Town Chicago where featured bands perform live on the stage. PW: This evening we will focus on the recorded music of Elmore James and his cousin Homesick James Williamson.
00:03:56 "Dust My Broom" by Elmore James; Sonny Boy Williamson II on harmonica.
00:06:42 PW: In "Sunnyland," Elmore James's electric guitar is more of a Chicago style, a more modern approach. The riff pattern and very heavy, explicit rhythm are much more in keeping with the Chicago modern styles of blues that became quite prevalent in the middle 50s.
00:08:04 "Sunnyland" by Elmore James
00:11:20 PW: In "Blues Before Sunrise," the guitar accompaniment pattern on this number is almost exclusively on Robert Johnson.
00:12:04 "Blues Before Sunrise" by Elmore James
00:14:45 PW: Now another number by Elmore James, in the more modern style of the Chicago blues. The guitar playing is much more in line with the jazz approaches.
00:15:20 "I Was A Fool" by Elmore James
00:18:05 PW: Tonight's final selection is Elmore's remake of Robert Johnson's "Standing At The Crossroads." Several horns have been added to the rhythm section. The band picks up the phrases following Elmore's guitar, echoing in a call and response pattern. This format becomes the trademarks of Elmore's blues in the 50s.
00:18:58 "Standing At The Crossroads"
00:21:45 PW: Let's hear Robert Johnson's original "Crossroad Blues" recorded in November 1936. We will see how much Elmore got from it, and how much he parted from it.
00:22:07 "Cross Road Blues" by Robert Johnson
00:24:35 PW: Homesick James Williamson was also a man who was influenced by Robert Johnson and his powerful music. We hear a recording titled "Homesick" made by Homesick James in 1952.
00:25:42 "Homesick" by Homesick James Williamson
00:28:28 PW makes a closing remark for the program.
00:29:41 End
Item-ID: AFC 2011/053: SR504 "Blue Monday Blues," #9 (1 of 2), undated
Rack number: RXH 5366
Extent: 1 sound tape reel (00:33:23) : analog, 7 1/2 ips, mono ; 7 in.
Vendor's digitization note: The program is distored at times and has significant hum.
Logger's note: This show features discussion of the development of the blues style in Chicago.
Time Content
Start Pete Welding (PW) makes an opening remark and advertises the Big John's club in Old Town Chicago where featured bands perform live on the stage. Tonight's program continues the discussion of the modern blues style with selections by Chester Arthur Burnett, better known by his stage name Howlin' Wolf. This selection, "Crying At Daylight," is notable as much for his powerful singing as it is for his interesting harmonica playing.
00:04:20 "Crying At Daylight" by Howlin' Wolf
00:08:10 PW: This next number is influenced more by jazz guitar. It is much more in line with the kind of blues that were being recorded during the mid-40s and right after the war years.
00:08:44 "Worried About My Baby"
00:11:40 PW: In early 1950 Howlin' Wolf left Memphis and moved to Chicago. Here is a segment of his recording before the move.
00:12:24 "House Rockin' Boogie" by Howlin' Wolf, with comments by Howlin' Wolf
00:14:26 PW: Before moving to Chicago in 1952, Howlin' Wolf recorded a few numbers in Memphis. Here is one example.
00:14:48 "Moanin' at Midnight" by Howlin' Wolf
00:17:40 PW: Wolf continues to record a number of traditional tunes, one of most interesting is "Forty Four," recorded after he moved to Chicago.
00:18:58 "Forty Four" by Howlin' Wolf
00:21:45 PW: Howlin' Wolf's singing of "Forty Four" was very similar to Charley Patton, the great Delta Mississippi blues man. The phrasing is remarkably alike. The next number is recorded in Howlin' Wolf's Chicago era.
00:22:17 "Evil (Is Going On)" by Howlin' Wolf
00:25:08 PW: Now we hear another example of Howlin' Wolf's use of traditional Mississippi materials and modern blues context. "Spoonful" was originally recorded by Charley Patton.
00:25:22 "Spoonful" by Howlin' Wolf
00:28:07 PW: "Spoonful" by Howlin' Wolf was recorded in 1960. Since that time Wolf's music has gone to a decline as he is concentrated on the performance of rather cheap material that have been manufactured for him by professional blues writers. However Howlin' Wolf was still one of the most powerful and strongest of all Chicago blues man.
00:29:02 "Three Hundred Pounds of Joy" by Howlin' Wolf
00:32:05 PW makes a closing remark for the program.
00:33:23 End
Item-ID: AFC 2011/053: SR505 "Blue Monday Blues," #10 (part 1 of 2), undated
Rack number: RXH 5367
Extent: 1 sound tape reel (00:29:26) : analog, 7 1/2 ips, mono ; 7 in.
Vendor's digitization note: The program is distored at times and has significant hum.
Logger's note: This show features discussion of the development of the blues style in Chicago.
Time Content
Start Pete Welding (PW) makes an opening remark and advertises the Big John's club in Old Town Chicago where featured bands perform live on the stage. Tonight's program will be about a few numbers about 78's music from PW's collection. Junior Wells achieved a great deal of success, commercially and artistically, after leaving the Muddy Water's band.
00:02:21 "'Bout The Break Of Day" by Junior Wells
00:04:55 PW: We will hear artists who achieved great fame before the pre-war years, but who happened to record after World War II. Their style changed in order to accommodate the prevalent Chicago sound. The first selection is music by Walter Davis, who is an expressive singer and pianist.
00:06:35 "So Long Baby" by Walter Davis
00:09:10 PW: Another artist who tried to make the switch from the pre-war style to the modern post-war style was Big Bill Broonzy. He was a prolific recording artist, and was identified as the "Chicago sound" before World War II.
00:09:50 "Southbound Train" by Big Bill Broonzy
00:12:45 PW: Now, another artist who scored success in the pre-war years, Hudson Whittaker (Tampa Red), a very fine singer and guitarist. He also recorded a few successful numbers in the post-war years.
00:13:40 "But I Forgive You" by Tampa Red, with vocalist and pianist Johnny Jones
00:16:30 PW: The final pre-war artist we hear with post-war transformation is Roosevelt Sykes from Louisiana. He is artistically the most successful of the four artists we hear this evening.
00:17:10 "Walking the Boogie" by Roosevelt Sykes
00:19:35 PW: Now we will hear one of the best zydeco players, Clifton Chenier, a singer and accordionist. Zydeco is a combination of French music and Negro blues, and it's associated with the Gulf coast region around Louisiana and Texas.
00:20:20 "Where Can My Baby Be" by Clifton Chenier
00:23:00 "The Big Wheel" by Clifton Chenier
00:25:45 PW: Andrew "Smokey" Hogg is one of the finest of the Texas bluesman.
00:26:05 "Gone Gone Gone" by Andrew "Smokey" Hogg
00:28:25 PW makes a closing remark for the program.
00:29:26 End
Item-ID: AFC 2011/053: SR068 "Blue Monday Blues" (unnumbered), circa 1966-1967
Rack number: RXH 3207
Extent: on one side of 1 sound tape reel (00:17:50) : analog, 7 1/2 ips, full track, mono ; 7 in.
Collector's original ID number: 79.
Item-ID: AFC 2011/053: SR545 "Health and Happiness Show" - Hank Williams, October 1949
Rack number: RXH 5407
Extent: 1 sound tape reel (Side 1: 00:37:00, Side 2: 01:03:44) : analog, 7 1/2 ips, mono ; 7 in.
The tape box spine reads: "Hank Williams on Radio Transcription"
Archivist's note: These recordings may have been dubbed from the 1993 CD release, rather than the original transcription discs. See https://www.discogs.com/release/1911825-Hank-Williams-Health-Happiness-Shows for more details.
Vendor's digitization note: There is significant hum on the tape, and the programs are distorted at times.
Side 1
Time Content
Start Opening song of the Hank Williams "Health and Happiness Show" radio broadcasts.
00:01:30 "You're Gonna Change (Or I'm Gonna Leave)" (song)
00:04:36 "(There's a) Bluebird on Your Window Sill" (song)
00:06:55 "A Tramp On The Street" (song)
00:11:46 An episode of the Hank Williams "Health and Happiness Show" radio broadcasts. Opening song.
00:12:58 "A Mansion on the Hill"(song)
00:16:15 "There'll Be No Tear Drops Tonight"(song)
00:19:55 "The Prodigal Son"(song)
00:23:25 Closing music of the show.
00:24:26 An episode of the Hank Williams "Health and Happiness Show" radio broadcasts. Opening song.
00:25:35 "Pan American" (song)
00:28:55 "Lovesick Blues" (song)
00:33:22 "I Saw the Light" (song)
00:36:12 Closing music of the show.
00:37:00 End
Side 2
Time Content
Start Opening song of the Hank Williams "Health and Happiness Show" radio broadcasts.
00:01:05 "I'm a Long Gone Daddy" (song)
00:04:35 "I'm Telling You" (song)
00:06:50 "When God Comes And Gathers His Jewels" (song)
01:11:03 Closing of the show.
00:12:38 An episode of the Hank Williams "Health and Happiness Show" radio broadcasts. Opening song.
00:13:45 "Lost Highway" (song)
00:17:25 "I Want to Live and Love" (song)
00:20:08 An episode of the Hank Williams "Health and Happiness Show" radio broadcasts. Opening song.
00:20:50 "I'll Have a New Body (I'll Have a New Life)" (song)
00:23:38 "Fingers on Fire" (song)
00:24:23 Closing music of the show.
00:25:05 An episode of the Hank Williams "Health and Happiness Show" radio broadcasts. Opening song.
00:26:26 "I Can't Get You Off My Mind" (song)
00:28:23 "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry" (song)
00:32:04 "Thy Burdens Are Greater Than Mine" (song)
00:36:10 Hank Williams introduces the band musicians.
00:37:46 An episode of the Hank Williams "Health and Happiness Show" radio broadcasts. Opening song.
00:38:46 "Mind Your Own Business" (song)
00:42:13 "Wedding Bells" (song)
00:46:55 "I've Just Told Mama Goodbye" (song)
00:49:15 Ending remark.
00:50:23 An episode of the Hank Williams "Health and Happiness Show" radio broadcasts. Opening song."
00:51:40 "Wedding Bells" (song)
00:55:50 "Lovesick Blues" (song)
00:59:52 "Where The Soul Of Man Never Dies" (song)
01:02:20 Ending remark.
01:03:44 End
Item-ID: AFC 2011/053: SR802 Humorous radio broadcast recordings, undated
Rack number: RXJ 7392
Extent: 1 sound tape reel (01:12:15) : analog ; 7 in.
Contents include a gag radio broadcast, with someone imitating Lionel Barrymore tells a story about a bear (circa 1953-1954). Frank Goss is the announcer. Other comedy sketches are included on the tape.
Item-ID: AFC 2011/053: SR239 "Preachin' The Blues" - radio show on KPFK-FM, Los Angeles; hosted by Frank Scott - Johnny Shines, guest, January 5, 1974
Rack number: RXH 4121
Extent: 1 sound tape reel (polyester, 00:52:24) : analog, 7 1/2 ips, half track, stereo ; 7 in.
Archivist's note: The interview was featured on Frank Scott's show, "Preachin' the Blues," broadcast on KPFK radio. The tape box indicates this is interview #3, but this is probably Shines interview number 3 in this collection. The interview is interspersed with songs sung by Johnny Shines, accompanying himself on guitar.
Time Content
Start recording begins with laughter; discussion about blues and church songs; his family history and a story about Ann Roman [sp?]
00:03:23 "I Don't Know"
00:07:29 how Shines came to Chicago: his life in Arkansas, his work as a farm hand, performing as a musician on weekends, Howlin' Wolf, trying to live and work in St. Louis, plans to go to Chicago and get a job and what he'd do if he didn't get a job, desire to visit Africa, being told that people in Africa have his Vanguard record and want him to visit, his strong feelings about going to Africa, speaks about slide guitar playing
00:12:54 "The Blues Came Falling Down"
00:16:38 the interview continues: discussion of Shines's slide guitar style, credits his return to the music business to Frank Scott and Mike Rowe, Shines pawned his guitar and equipment and sore off playing guitar again, Scott and Rowe renting a guitar for him; Scott and Shines discuss photos Scott shows to him, reasons he gave up playing guitar, playing jazz instead of blues, taking care of his children and grandchildren, the need to have a living income, dealings with record companies, dealings with Al Benson, trouble with the union (playing for under scale), losing his union card, issues resolved, leaving Chicago to live in Alabama
00:27:45 "Nobody's Fault But My Own"
00:31:38 the interview continues: how Shines changes traditional songs and keeps his interest in the music, playing gigs in the Los Angeles area, mention of Big Mama Thornton and T-Bone Walker, forthcoming albums by Shines, playing solo vs. with a band, songs he learned from Robert Johnson, Johnson's personality, when other people play Johnson's songs
00:39:59 "Kind Hearted Woman" (a song by Robert Johnson)
00:44:09 where Shines will play next (locations and events), taking his family around the U.S. and Canada to see other places
00:48:15 "Ramblin' Blues"
00:51:32 Scott thanks Shines for taking the time to do the interview, plugs the gig Shines had currently with Albert Collins at The Ash Grove.
00:52:24 End
Item-ID: AFC 2011/053: SR776 "Preachin' The Blues" - radio show on KPFK-FM, Los Angeles; hosted by Frank Scott - Johnny Turner, guest, February 16, 1976
Rack number: RAA 59314
Extent: 1 sound tape reel (01:28:20) : analog, 7 1/2 ips, half track, stereo ; 10 in.
Collector's original ID number: 19.
Archivist's note: Johnny Turner is better known as John "Honeyboy" Turner. On the radio show, Scott interviewed Turner, who played guitar and sang live, backed by Zaven Jambazian on harmonica.
Vendor's digitization note: The source program has distortion and hiss. The beginning of the program is cut off.
Item-ID: AFC 2011/053: SR693 "Songs by Sinatra," circa 1942-1947
Rack number: RXH 5570
Extent: 1 sound tape reel (Track 1: 01:31:26, Track 2: 01:25:13, Track 3: 01:30:10, Track 4: 01:32:29) : analog, 3 3/4 ips, quarter track, mono ; 7 in.
Archivist's note: Episodes from Sinatra's radio program, "Songs by Sinatra."
Vendor's digitization note: The program is distorted at times, and there is crosstalk from the tape.
Item-ID: AFC 2011/053: SR695 "Timex All-Star Jazz Show" [?], Reel 2339, circa 1957-1959
Rack number: RXH 5572
Extent: 1 sound tape reel (Channel 1: 01:16:21, Channel 2: 01:32:46, Channel 3: 01:25:27, Channel 4: 01:33:52) : analog, 3 3/4 ips, mono ; 7 in.
Vendor's digitization note: For Channel 2, there is a gap in the program (from the source tape) from 01:16:43 - 01:23:13, and the program is distorted at times. For Channel 3, there is a gap in the program (from the source tape) from 01:13:39 - 01:19:12. For Channel 4, there is a speed fluctuation at the start of the program (from the source tape), and crosstalk on the tape.
Subseries 4: Compilations of dubbed commercial recordings
These recordings are organized by music style, record label, or related categories.
Item-ID: AFC 2011/053: SR788 Dubs for "All Out and Down," undated
Rack number: RAA 59326
Extent: 1 sound tape reel : analog (00:28:05) ; analog, 15 ips, half-track, stereo, 10 in.
Vendor's digitization note: The recording begins with a test tone. The program has distortion and hiss.
Item-ID: AFC 2011/053: SR561 Blues Is Killing Me (Juke Joint 1501), 1978
Rack number: RXH 5422
Extent: 1 sound tape reel : analog ; 7 in.
Dub recording.
Item-ID: AFC 2011/053: SR155 Standing Ovation - Count Basie Orchestra (Dot 25938); That Latin Beat: Antobal's Latin All-Stars Conducted by Chico O'Farrill (Dot 25445) (tape side 1); Goin' Places - Margaret Whiting (Dot 25072); Dori Howard Sings, with the Eddie Costa Quartet and Don Elliott Quintet (Dot 3230) (tape side 2), 1959-1969
Rack number: RXH 4038
Extent: 1 sound tape reel (polyester; Side 1: 01:02:45, Side 2: 01:04:05) : analog, 3 3/4 ips, quarter track, stereo ; 7 in.
Dubs from commercial recordings.
Side 1
Time Content
Start Instrumental piece by the Count Basie Orchestra (CBO): "Down for Double"
00:03:12 The next instrumental piece, titled "Li'l Darlin'"
00:08:02 The start of the next instrumental selection by CBO called "Broadway"
00:11:39 CBO play "Jive at Five"
00:15:32 CBO play "Cherry Point"
00:20:34 Jumpin' at the Woodside" - CBO
00:24:07 The beginning of the next instrumental selection titled "One O'clock Jump"
00:25:28 The next selection called "Shiny Stockings"
00:30:35 CBO perform their next piece "Blue and Sentimental"
00:35:06 CBO perform "Every Tub"
00:38:05 The start of the next instrumental selection called "Corner Pocket"
00:44:03 The next instrumental piece titled "The Kid from Red Bank"
00:46:36 The next selection by CBO titled "One O'clock Jump"
00:48:22 Chico O'Farrill (CF) conducting Antobal's Latin All-Stars. The first piece they perform is "Una Aventura Mas"
00:50:39 The beginning of the next instrumental piece called "Astronaut Special"
00:53:21 "Voodoo Moon" by CF
00:56:05 "Playtime in Brazil" by CF
00:58:24 A performance of "Pachanga Universal" (Eugenio Fondeur)
01:00:36 The next piece with voice and accompaniment titled "Fiesta en El Solar
01:00:34 End
Side 2
Time Content
Start Begins with Margaret Whiting singing a rendition of "The Gypsy in My Soul" (J. Mandel)
00:02:29 Voice and accompaniment of "Sentimental Journey" (Mandel)
00:05:33 The selection "Any Place I Hang My Hat Is Home" (Frank Comstock)
00:08:18 The start of the song titled "I'm Gonna Move to the Outskirts of Town" (Skip Martin)
00:10:43 Introduction to the song "Gone With the Wind" (Pete King)
00:12:42 The start of "Runnin' Wild" (Pete Rugolo)
00:14:27 The selection "Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea" (Rugolo)
00:16:37 Introduction to the song "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" (Marty Paich)
00:19:47 The start of "Hit the Road to Dreamland" (Comstock)
00:22:20 The selection "East of the Sun and West of the Moon" (King)
00:25:02 The introduction to "Song of the Wanderer" (Martin)
00:27:29 The selection "Home (When Shadows Fall)" (Paich)
00:30:08 The song titled "The Moon Was Yellow" with Dori Howard singing the remainder of the pieces. She is joined by Eddie Costa and the Don Elliott Quintets
00:32:36 The start of "My One and Only Love"
00:35:18 Introduction to the next song, "Here I am in Love Again"
00:38:29 The song titled "I Get a Kick out of You"
00:41:08 Introduction to the next song titled "Lonely Love"
00:43:48 The selection "Mean to Me"
00:46:01 The start of the song "How Long Has This Been Going On?"
00:48:41 The song titled "Duke's Place"
00:51:18 Introduction to "You're Not Alone"
00:54:26 Introduction to the next song titled "Monday"
00:56:26 The next selection called "Stop, Look and Run"
01:00:16 The song titled, "Mood Indigo"
01:03:52 End
Item-ID: AFC 2011/053: SR412 Blues 78s, #11; Peggy Seeger, undated
Rack number: RXH 4652
Extent: 1 sound tape reel (01:00:32) : analog, 7 1/2 ips, stereo ; 7 in.
Logger's note: Dubs of commercial recordings by various singers, including Peggy Seeger, Furry Lewis, Memphis Minnie, and others.
Vendor's digitization note: The program is distorted at times.
Time Content
Start "Cumberland Gap" by Peggy Seeger
00:02:04 "The Lady of Carlisle" by Peggy Seeger
00:06:16 "The Deer Song" by Peggy Seeger
00:09:08 "Come All Ye Fair and Tender Maidens" by Peggy Seeger
00:12:12 "I Never Will Marry" by Peggy Seeger
00:14:53 "Devilish Mary" by Peggy Seeger
00:16:55 "The Fair Maid Freed By the Shore" by Peggy Seeger
00:19:21 "Soldier's Joy" by Peggy Seeger
00:20:19 "Shady Grove" by Peggy Seeger
00:21:37 "Georgia Buck" by Peggy Seeger
00:22:37 "The Wife of Usher's Well" by Peggy Seeger
00:27:13 "Saturday Blues" by Ishman Bracey
00:30:46 "Left Alone Blues" by Ishman Bracey
00:34:28 "Kassie Jones" (part 1), by Furry Lewis
00:37:37 "Kassie Jones" (part 2), by Furry Lewis
00:40:47 "Honey" by Bo Carter
00:43:38 "What You Want Your Daddy to Do" by Bo Carter
00:46:45 "I'm talking About You" by Memphis Minnie (very poor sound quality)
00:49:22 "Me And My Chauffeur Blues" by Memphis Minnie
00:52:09 "Can't Afford To Lose My Man" by Memphis Minnie
00:54:42 "Please Set A Date" by Memphis Minnie
00:57:30 "True Love" by Memphis Minnie
01:00:32 End
Item-ID: AFC 2011/053: SR410 Blues 78s, #12, undated
Rack number: RXH 4650
Extent: 1 sound tape reel (01:04:01) : analog, 3 3/4 ips, mono ; 7 in.
Logger's note: Dubs of commercial recordings by various singers.
Vendor's digitization note: The program is distorted at times.
Time Content
Start "Mama's Advice" by Peetie Wheatstraw (poor sound quality)
00:03:26 "Police Station Blues" by Peetie Wheatstraw (poor sound quality)
00:06:40 "Midnight Blues" by Peetie Wheatstraw (poor sound quality)
00:10:08 "Johnnie Blues" by Peetie Wheatstraw (poor sound quality)
00:13:00 "Deep Sea Diver" by Leroy Henderson (poor sound quality)
00:15:53 "Low Mellow Man Blues" by Leroy Henderson (poor sound quality)
00:18:53 "F.D.R. Blues" by Champion Jack Dupree (poor sound quality)
00:21:35 "God Bless Our New President" by Champion Jack Dupree (poor sound quality)
00:24:22 "South Bound Water" by Lonnie Johnson (poor sound quality)
00:27:08 "Back Water Blues" by Lonnie Johnson (poor sound quality)
00:30:44 "Bo Weevil Blues" by Madame "Ma" Rainey; accompanied by Lovie Austin
00:33:36 "Cotton Crop Blues" by James Cotton
00:36:40 "Charity Blues" by Gene Gilmore (poor sound quality)
00:39:19 "Brome Street Blues" by Skoodle Dum Doo and Sheffield (poor sound quality)
00:42:16 "West Kinney Street Blues" by Skoodle Dum Doo and Sheffield (poor sound quality)
00:45:01 "Pretty Man Blues" by Luella Miller (poor sound quality)
00:47:40 "Dago Hill Blues" by Luella Miller (poor sound quality)
00:50:40 "Love Me Or Let me Be" by James (Beale Street) Clark.
00:53:32 "Get Ready To Meet Your Man" by James (Beale Street) Clark
00:56:12 "Dew Drop Alley Stomp" by Sugar Underwood
00:59:34 "Davis Street Blues" by Sugar Underwood
01:02:43 "Pig Meat Blues" by Ardell Bragg (poor sound quality; the song ends abruptly)
01:04:01 End
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